NUKE Green Screen Keying Building on the Fundamentals

Green Screen keying is one of the core fundamental skills and techniques used in Compositing. This course will teach you advanced Green Screen keying techniques. Software required: NUKE
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 25, 2017
Duration
3h 57m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 25, 2017
Duration
3h 57m
Description

Have you ever wondered how to finesse the fine details of Green Screen keys, but don't know where to start? If so, this course is for you. In this course, NUKE Green Screen Keying Building on the Fundamentals, you'll learn how to complete even the most advanced Green Screen shots and then composite them over a new background. As a continuation of the NUKE Green Screen Keying Fundamentals course, you'll discover how to combine multiple mattes for the best optimized final Alpha. Next, you'll work through alternative Keying workflows inside of NUKE, learning how problem solve challenging Keys for both Green Screen and non Green Screen images. Finally, you'll refine any finishing details, such as transparency, motion blur, and hair detail. The final RGB image will be despilled and then composited over top of a newly integrated background. When you're finished with this course, you'll not only have a completed Green Screen composite, but you'll also have the knowledge and skills needed to key any advanced Green Screen image in the future. Software required: NUKE

About the author
About the author

Melissa brings 15 years of industry experience to Pluralsight. Born and raised in Winnipeg, Canada, she first became interested in multimedia in high school.

More from the author
NUKE Green Screen Keying Fundamentals
Beginner
3h 30m
Jan 23, 2017
Advanced Clean Plate Techniques in NUKE
Advanced
2h 14m
Jul 19, 2015
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, everyone. My name is Melissa Best and welcome to my course, NUKE Green Screen Keying Building on the Fundamentals. I am a senior visual effects instructor at Vancouver Film School with over 15 years of production experience as a compositor. My most recent production role was a compositing supervisor for a feature film. This course builds upon the terminology and skills reviewed in Pluralsight's NUKE Green Screen Keying Fundamentals. Completion of the fundamentals course or already existing knowledge of keying in NUKE is suggested. Some of the major topics that we will cover include combining core and fringe mattes, keying in alternative color spaces, keying techniques and workflows for transparency, motion blur, and hair detail, despill and edge treatment, re-introducing lost details, and of course, keying templates for you to use both for production and your own personal projects. By the end of this course you'll know how to tackle challenging green screen keys and how to finesse them to take your shots through to a final composite. Before beginning this course you should be familiar with green screen keying fundamentals and basic operations inside of NUKE. I hope you will join me on this journey to learn green screen keying with the NUKE Green Screen Keying Building on the Fundamentals course at Pluralsight.

Alternative Keying Workflows
In this module we are going to take a look at alternative keying workflows. So let's take a look at a brief overview of what we're going to take a look at. The first thing that we're going to look at are the benefits of keying in different color spaces. So for example, log verses linear color space. There are a couple of other color spaces that we'll take a look at and why they may be great alternatives for the keying workflow. Next we're going to look at an introduction to the keyer and luma keying. And finally we're going to look at how to combine multiple channels for an optimized final alpha. So we might take the red channel and combine it with the red channel or the blue with the green and so forth to really make a great final alpha. So now that we have a brief summary of what we're going to review in this particular module, I look forward to seeing you in our next clip.

Keying for Transparency, Motion Blur, and Hair Detail
In this module, we're going to take a look at keying for transparency, Motion Blur and hair detail. So let's look at a brief overview of what we're going to learn. First thing that we're going to take a look at is keying for transparency and hair detail. So how can we get the best out of our key, where do we sample, and how can we retain that detail going forward? Next we're going to look at alpha optimization for reducing edge crawling. So sometimes our edges aren't stable, they produce rippling and it doesn't look very good once it's been premultiplied. So what are the ways that we can reduce that in order to retain the best alpha possible? And last, we're going to look at keying for Motion Blur, so again, similar for keying transparency and hair detail, where can we sample for that Motion Blur and what are some of the treatment techniques that we can use to reintroduce all that missing data? So now that we have a brief overview of this particular module, I look forward to seeing you in our next clip.

Despill
In this module we're going to take a look at Color Spill and Despill. So let's take a look at a brief overview of what we're going to learn. So the first item that we're going to look at is the definition and the causes of color spill. So what exactly is spill and what are the causes for it? Next, we're going to look at despill basics. We're going to look at three basic tools, each one of them that creates slightly different despills, and that's going to be the keylight tool, the expressions tool, and the huecorrect. Next, we're going to look at indepth despill with operators. So we're going to use different operators in combination with one another, and those can typically be found inside of the merge tool. So we're going to combine them together just so that we can take that despill a little bit further and really refine it. And last, we're going to look at refining select despilled edges. So certain edges might not work for an overall despill, so we're going to do just subtle color corrections to each one of those edges that need a little bit more work so that they can be really well integrated into our final composite. So now that we have a brief overview of this particular module I look forward to seeing you in our next clip.

Re-introducing Lost Details
In this module we're going to look at reintroducing lost details. So, let's take a look at a brief overview of what we're going to learn. First, we're going to look at reintroducing lost luminance. So, often when we work through the de-spill process, we will lose luminosity and details in our image. Reintroducing this information helps us to preserve as much information from the original plate as possible. Next we're going to look at integrating the background with edge transparency, so we want to make sure that the background is visible coming through the edges of all our transparent pixels to help it make it look like it's better integrated into our final image. And last, we're going to look at additive keying. So, unlike its name, it is not an actual traditional keyer but rather serves as a really great alternative to introducing the lost detail that could not be added through traditional keying methods. So, now that we have a brief overview of this particular module, I look forward to seeing you in our next clip.

Final Image Integration
In this module we're going to take a look at final image integration. So let's take a look at a brief overview of what we're going to learn. The first item is lightwrap. So what exactly is lightwrap and how do we apply it to our image so that our edges look better integrated into our final plate? Next we're going to take a look at final integration tips and tricks. So we might find a few odd frames that are not quite working yet and how can we add to them and fix those areas to take it through to final completion? And last, we're going to look at adding missing noise or regraining as it's also referred to. So where do we have missing noise in our plate, particularly in our background image? So now that we have a brief overview of what we are going to learn in this particular module, let's take a look at our next clip.

Template and Quality Check Overview
In this clip we're going to take a look at a brief overview of what we're going to learn in this module. So let's have a quick look. The first thing that we're going to look at is a simple keying template. So this really involves the core and the fringe mattes being combined together and then being applied to a separate despill. That despilled image is then going to be composited over top of a new background. Next we're going to look at a more advanced keying template. So this involves all the steps from the simple keying template, but we're just building on top of it. So this includes all the little tips and tricks from just refining the edge details, fixing the motion blur, color correcting, and despilling those edges so that it is properly integrated into our final background image. Lastly, we're going to look at a quality checklist for final composite. So this is a really great thing to have on hand, be it for green screen keying or any composite in general. So some of these elements can be used in any other comps. They will allow us to make sure that we are retaining all the detail possible from our original image and that we have a really fine-tuned NUKE script so that we have the most optimized comp possible. So now that we have completed a brief overview of this particular module, let's take a look at our next clip.