Getting Started with Phoenix

Phoenix is the de facto web framework for Elixir. This course will teach you the basics of Phoenix by walking through building an Elixir application.
Course info
Rating
(31)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 28, 2017
Duration
2h 52m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(31)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 28, 2017
Duration
2h 52m
Description

In order to deliver an Elixir application over the web, it's essential to understand certain key concepts, such as models and views. With this course, Getting Started with Phoenix, you'll learn about how a functional programming language (Elixir) presents an application on the web. You'll see a way to structure your project that keeps application logic separate from presentation logic. You will also learn how to deploy your application, so that it doesn't just reside on your computer. By the end of the course, you'll have an application that you can use for future reference and be equipped to start writing new web applications with Phoenix and Elixir.

About the author
About the author

Nate's first program was written in QBasic on an 8086 clone his dad built. Since then he's written applications in C++, .NET, and Node.js.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Nate Taylor, and welcome to my course Getting Started with Phoenix. I'm a software engineer at Aviture out of Omaha, Nebraska. Phoenix combines the power of functional programming with the common pattern of MVC to deliver a fully functional application via the web. This course will introduce you to the Phoenix framework by creating an elixir application and delivering it across the web. Some of the major topics that we will cover include interacting with database models, displaying and interacting with data on forms, real-time notifications, and deploying your application. By the end of this course, you'll know how to create and deploy a new Phoenix project, as well as all the steps necessary to add new content to an application. You'll even learn how you can provide real-time communication to users on your site. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the elixir language. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Phoenix with the Getting Started with Phoenix course at Pluralsight.

Putting It Together: Creating an Event
At this point in the course, you've learned a lot about Phoenix. You've covered models, views, controllers, and templates. You've used ecto to create and fetch data from your database. You've got a page that lists all your events, as well as a detail page that will show a specific event. Your application is starting to take shape. However, the application right now is pretty much read only. The only thing your user is able to do is display data that already exists in the database. Additionally, the screens you've developed to this point have been piecemeal, focusing on a specific portion of Phoenix, and not the holistic screen. In this module, you will likely not cover any new Phoenix concepts; instead, you're going to put them all together to create a new page that will allow a user to create an event. This will involve using route and template helpers, which were covered in the previous module, as well as controllers, models, and ecto changesets, each of which have been covered previously in the course. It's a chance to perform a task like you would in the real world. For this module, imagine you're working on a team that's developing an event planning application. You might encounter the following features, and they'll be covered in this module. First, create a form for the user to create a new event, including title, date, and location. Number two, after successfully creating an event, take the user to the details page for that event. Number three, add a link on the event list page that takes the user to the form to add a new event. By the end of this module, you will have successfully completed each of these feature stories. At that point, the bulk of the application will be complete with a few significant, but straightforward changes coming in future modules.