Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 8, 2016
Duration
1h 43m
Description

Natural effects are a brilliant way to add energy to a photo or a design. Elements like fire, water, and smoke are all very familiar but often difficult to capture in a way that is useful as a digital asset. One solution is to purchase stock images, but what if you could generate these effects for yourself? In this course, Photographing Digital Assets, you'll be taught how to achieve these effects from start to finish. You will learn safe and fun techniques to create these effects in way that is controllable and easy to capture with a digital camera. Then you will learn how to best capture these effects with a basic DSLR, and finally how to process the images in Photoshop to create a library of digital assets. By the end of this course, you'll be able to create these effects for yourself and you'll stop having to pay for the same tired stock images everybody else uses--and your work will be better for it! Software Required: Adobe Photoshop.

About the author
About the author

Kirk is a professional graphics with almost 20 years of experience, and an Adobe Certified Expert in Photoshop. His work has been published over 400 times in internationally acclaimed publications. Kirk has experience with a broad range of subjects in design. Kirk is just your friendly neighborhood Graphics Geek!

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello, everybody, my name is Kirk Nelson, and welcome to my course on photographing digital assets. I'm a freelance graphics artist with over 15 years of experience. I've been published over 400 times in internationally acclaimed industry publications. I'm an Adobe-certified expert in PhotoShop, and overall, I'm just your friendly neighborhood graphics geek. Natural effects are a brilliant way to add visual energy to a photo or a design. Elements like fire and water and smoke, they're very familiar but often difficult to capture in a way that is useful as a digital asset. One solution is to purchase stock images. But what if you could generate these effects for yourself? In this course, we're going to explore safe and fun techniques to create these effects in a way that is controllable and easy to capture with your digital camera. So stop paying for the same tired stock images everybody else uses, learn to create your own natural effects instead. Some of the major topics that this course will cover is creating a fireball effect using common household elements, safely capturing an explosive fire effect, how to use dry ice to create a prolonged smoke and fog effect, easy setups to capture crisp, beautiful sparkling water splash effects, and how to use these digital resources as artistic elements. By the end of this course, you'll know how to create these effects for your own, capture them with your camera, process them in Photoshop, and build up your own library of digital assets, and then how to use these assets in an exciting piece of digital artwork. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with operating a DSLR in manual mode. You should also be familiar with the basic features and interface of Adobe Photoshop. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn more about creating your own exciting natural element resources, with photographing digital assets here at Pluralsight.

Creating the Fire Effect with Household Items
Hello, everybody, my name is Kirk Nelson. I want to welcome you to this course on photographing digital assets. Our first module is creating the fire effect with household items. We'll go over the materials required for the effect, how to produce the effect practically, how to capture that effect digitally, and finally how to touch up those digital images in Photoshop so they can be a usable asset. Let's get started by going over some safety guidelines first. This effect does involve live flames which can burn you, or that can ignite flammable objects nearby, so please exercise caution. Always keep a fire extinguisher nearby and make sure that you're familiar with how to operate it. Perform the effect in a large, well ventilated area with a hard floor that's easy to clean and flame-resistant. The materials required for this effect are pretty simple. They can probably be found at your local hardware store for less than 20 bucks. You will need some powdered coffee creamer. Okay, that might not be at the hardware store, but I'm fairly certain the local grocery store does have it. A length of clear vinyl tubing. The length I used is about six feet in length, but anything over three feet long should work just fine. A barbecue lighter, the longer the better. A small funnel. The tip of the funnel needs to be small enough to fit inside the mouth of the tubing. And finally, some zip ties to hold everything together. To begin, align the tubing along the length of the lighter. They should be even at the end. Then slip a zip tie around both of them and pull it snug. Add a second zip tie to secure the tube and pull it tight. Make sure the position of the tube doesn't interfere with the function of the lighter. Clip the excess ends with a pair of scissors, and your fireball rig is complete.