Play by Play: Converting Synchronous Calls to Asynchronous in ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core

In this course, you’ll learn synchronous and asynchronous code and the role it can play in Web projects. The materials for this course are available at: https://github.com/DanWahlin/ASPNETCore-Sync-Async-EF
Course info
Rating
(56)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 29, 2017
Duration
56m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(56)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 29, 2017
Duration
56m
Description

Play by Play is a series in which top technologists work through a problem in real time, unrehearsed and unscripted. In this course, Play by Play: Converting Synchronous Calls to Asynchronous in ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core, Dan Wahlin and John Papa talk about the benefits of asynchronous code, C#'s async/await keywords, and how they can be used to convert synchronous code to asynchronous in ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core. Learn the key differences between synchronous and asynchronous code, the role of async/await in C#, how to convert synchronous Entity Framework Core code to asynchronous, and wow to call into ASP.NET Core APIs using Angular. By the end of this Play by Play, you’ll see how easy it is to use asynchronous coding techniques in your ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core code bases. The materials for this course are available at: https://github.com/DanWahlin/ASPNETCore-Sync-Async-EF

About the author
About the author

John Papa is a Principal Developer Advocate with Microsoft and an alumnus of the Google Developer Expert, Microsoft Regional Director, and MVP programs.

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About the author

Dan Wahlin founded Wahlin Consulting, which provides consulting and training services on JavaScript, Angular, Node.js, C#, ASP.NET MVC, Web API, and Docker. He is a Google GDE, Microsoft MVP and Regional Director, and speaks at conferences and user groups around the world.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Welcome to this Play by Play course on Converting Synchronous Calls to Asynchronous in ASP. NET Core and Entity Framework Core. My name's Dan Wahlin, and in this course, I sit down with John Papa to talk about synchronous and asynchronous code, and the role it can play in web projects. This include discussing the benefits of asynchronous code, C#'s Async Await keywords, and how they can be used to convert synchronous code to asynchronous in ASP. NET Core and Entity Framework Core. Now if you're new to Play by Play courses, they're unscripted and on the fly, and John and I have a lot of fun with the discussion as a result. Some of the major topics that we cover include the key differences between synchronous and asynchronous code, the role of Async Await in C#, how to convert synchronous entity framework core code to asynchronous, we also show how to convert synchronous ASP. NET Core controller actions to asynchronous, the role of dependency injection, and how you can call ASP. NET Core APIs using Angular. By the end of this Play by Play you'll see how easy it is to use asynchronous coding techniques in your ASP. NET Core and Entity Framework Core code basis. So come join us for a concise, focused, and fun look at asynchronous coding, and learn how it can change how you build your ASP. NET applications. Now after watching this Play by Play, you can dive deeper into ASP. NET Core and Angular, by watching my Integrating Angular with ASP. NET Core RESTful Services course, which is also available on Pluralsight.

Synchronous to Asynchronous
I think this is though where you either decide that hey I'm just going to kind of skate by, or John may say, you know Dan, why don't you just do it the right way? Since ASP. Net is designed for asynchronous code, why don't we just make it asynchronous? And I think the big deal here is that, it may be right, it may not be for your situation as you mentioned, but it's more of a, it's not hard, right, to go from async to sync, and the benefits are huge. Exactly. So even if you only have a person hitting in an hour, going async is not going to be a problem. No. But if you do get that thousand people or more, yeah, you're going to be okay. Well you can imagine startup. You know they go with this and they're like, well we're not going to have that many users initially, you know you've all… It's a good problem to have. Right, you remember the fail whale you know Twitter used to have, you know, because it just wasn't designed for the scale they ended up getting. Now that would be a problem to have obviously on a public facing site, but yeah this will right here potentially cause a problem--- Okay.