Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 14, 2017
Duration
1h 24m
Description

Play by Play is a series in which top technologists work through a problem in real time, unrehearsed and unscripted. In this course, Play by Play: How to Mobilize Your Salesforce App, Gaurav Kheterpal and Don Robins explore the many options for mobilizing Salesforce applications. Learn declarative configuration of built-in Salesforce1 mobile features, building Lightning Pages with Lightning Components, and mobilizing Visualforce pages with the modern look and feel of the Salesforce Lightning Design System. By the end of this course, you’ll have learned a step-by-step approach to decide which approach is the best suited for mobilizing your Salesforce app.

About the author
About the author

Don Robins is a well known Salesforce MVP, instructor, author, and speaker. A custom business application developer for more decades than he cares to admit, he focuses on Salesforce technical instruction and knowledge sharing.

More from the author
More courses by Don Robins
About the author

Gaurav Kheterpal has been building mobile, web, and telecom applications for over 14 years. He has been working on the Force.com platform since 2009 and was an early adopter of Force.com mobile development.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Welcome to this Salesforce Play by Play with Pluralsight. Salesforce Play by Play is an interactive series where we sit down with Salesforce experts such as MVPs, consultants, developers and architects to discuss common challenges faced every day by Salesforce customers. We'll be learning while discussing concepts and debating trade offs and various approaches to solving real-world problems. We learn by reviewing system configurations or writing code and then exploring the benefits of any particular solution. In this course we challenge Salesforce MVP and mobile architect Gaurav Kheterpal to help us understand the many options for mobilizing Salesforce applications. Gaurav walks us through each available approach from the declarative configuration of built-in Salesforce One mobile features to building lightning pages with lightning components and the drag and drop app builder and even mobilizing visual force pages with the modern look and feel of the Salesforce lightning design system. Then we'll break away completely from force. com and step into the world of native and hybrid mobile app development using the mobile SDKs for both the Android and iOS platforms. Along the way we'll discuss the limitations and benefits of each and clarify why and when each would be best suited for your mobile apps, your requirements and your users. Whether you're a declarative or programmatic Salesforce developer, a mobile architect, a project lead or a manager, come learn about the core options available to mobilize your Salesforce apps. Please join us for Mobilizing Salesforce. We hope you enjoy it.

Building Hybrid Apps with the Mobile SDK
What if you wanted to build content that was HTML content that you wanted to surface inside your, I mean you really wanted to get graphically motivated here, but you wanted to leverage HTML skills, CSS skills, and graphic skills, you can surface them inside, I know you can surface them inside an Apple native iPhone shell, can you do the same thing in Android? Yes, you can do that. So the way it works is that both the SDKs, the iOS SDK and the Android SDK, we have just seen one of the approaches, which is the native development approach, but those SDKs also allow something, which is called the hybrid development approach. It's called hybrid because it uses the best of both worlds, for example, you're still packaging your application as an iOS application, it's an IPA or as an Android application, it's an APK, but the code that is being wrapped in that APK or that IPA file is actually not being returned in Objective-C, Swift or in Java in case of Android, it's written either as your Visualforce page, like you would usually write, and it's called a hybrid remote app because it's a hybrid app, but it's invoking your remote pages, which reside in your org, or it could be a hybrid local app. So in a hybrid local app it would basically be leveraging your HTML pages, your JavaScript, your CSS, and then cross-compiling it to a format, which is like compatible with iOS or with Android.