Play by Play: Care and Maintenance of Development VMs

In this course, you’ll learn about configuring and maintaining development virtual machines.
Course info
Rating
(37)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 18, 2017
Duration
49m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(37)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 18, 2017
Duration
49m
Description

Play by Play is a series in which top technologists work through a problem in real time, unrehearsed, and unscripted. In this course, Play by Play: Care and Maintenance of Development VMs, Orin Thomas and Troy Hunt discuss what you need to know about configuring and maintaining development virtual machines. Learn about why you would use a development VM, how you can configure them to get the best performance, and real life examples of how you can configure Hyper-V to create a perfect development environment within a virtual machine. By the end of this course, you’ll have all the information you need to know about looking after and maintaining development VMs.

About the author
About the author

Troy Hunt is a Microsoft Regional Director and MVP for Developer Security. He's a regular conference speaker, frequent blogger at troyhunt.com and is the creator of the data breach notification service known as “Have I Been Pwned”.

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About the author

Orin Thomas is an MVP, a Microsoft Regional Director, an MCT, and has a string of Microsoft MCSE and MCITP certifications.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Good day everyone, I'm Orin Thomas, and I'm Troy Hunt, and welcome to our Play By Play on Care and Maintenance of Development Virtual Machines. I'm a Microsoft Regional Director, a decade-long MVP, I've written more than 40 books for Microsoft Press, have authored a bunch of courses for Pluralsight, and I'm completing a doctorate of information technology degree at Charles Sturt University. And I'm a Microsoft Regional Director and most valuable professional for developer security, and I have a passion for security. I've written many, many other Pluralsight courses on security, plus, I'm also the creator of the data breach notification service known as Have I been pwned. In this course, we'll discuss what you need to know about configuring and maintaining development virtual machines. Why use a development virtual machine, how you can configure them to get the best performance, how to use options, such as desktop switching, checkpoints, and solutions, such as Chocolatey to provision your VMs. How to connect your VMs to wireless networks, use options, such as nested virtualization, deduplication, enhance session mode, and give you some tips on how to get data into isolated VMs. But it doesn't end there. This course includes real life examples of how you can configure Hyper-V to create a perfect development environment within a virtual machine. To complete the course, all you need is a passion for learning how to make the most out of Hyper-V and virtual machines, and a spare hour to watch the course. I hope you'll join us on this journey to learn how to configure and manage development virtual machines, with the Care and Maintenance of Development Virtual Machines Play By Play, at Pluralsight.

Networking
Where are we going from here, what else can we do? So one of the other things that we probably need to talk about, and it's one of the things that people worry about, is networking. So we've obviously got laptops here, and one of the challenges with any laptop, it used to be how on earth do I get my virtual machine to talk to the network? Now this is very easy with Windows 10, because in Windows 10 if you come across here to Virtual Switch Manager, what you can do is you can create what's called a new external switch that is connected to your, and you can see it here, your wireless network interface card. So when you create that, what will happen is that the virtual machine will share that wireless network card. So that has the advantage of allowing the VM direct access to whatever Wi-Fi access point. Whatever, I was going to say plugged in, but it's Wi-Fi, so whatever the host machine has access to. So yeah, whatever the host machine's using for networking, it can do it. Now, you're going to get obviously much better performance if you're plugged into the LAN, but you can do it this way; and one of the other things that you can do if you're like me and you're running lots of virtual machines, well, you can actually then set up a private network and another virtual machine to function as a gateway between that private network and the internet, and then all it to communicate that way.