Microsoft Azure for Enterprises: What and Why

How should enterprises start using Microsoft Azure? And more importantly, why? This course takes a broad look at the scenarios and the rationale for adopting Azure.
Course info
Rating
(507)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 6, 2015
Duration
1h 13m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(507)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 6, 2015
Duration
1h 13m
Description

The world is changing, and public cloud platforms like Microsoft Azure are a big part of that change. But where should enterprises start adopting this new technology? What are the business reasons for doing this? And how can you mitigate the risks? Whether you're an IT leader, an IT pro, or a developer, watch this course for a survey of the scenarios and the reasons for using each one.

About the author
About the author

David Chappell is Principal of Chappell & Associates in San Francisco, California. David has been the keynote speaker for more than a hundred events, and his seminars have been attended by tens of thousands of people in forty-five countries. His books have been published in a dozen languages, and his consulting clients have included HP, IBM, Microsoft, Stanford University, and Target Corporation.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Azure Infrastructure Scenarios
For the rest of this course, I want to talk about scenarios. Because concrete scenarios, what they look like and why they have value are, I believe, the best way to understand why people are moving to public cloud platforms. I will divide those scenarios into two big broad categories, infrastructure and new applications. I'm going to start with infrastructure. Here, there are a few scenarios that people very commonly start with in public cloud platforms like Azure. And by people, I mean people like you, enterprises. Using data storage is one of them. Cloud identity is also one of them. VMs on demand, especially for dev/test scenarios, is a very important example. Disaster recovery can be essential here. Deploying packaged apps like SharePoint or SAP on Azure is certainly an option. And moving your existing apps to the public cloud is also an option. As I said earlier, however, this is all about trust. Almost nobody starts by saying, "Okay, I think I'll move all my apps to Azure next week. " People don't do that. Because they're nervous. It's a whole new world. Far more common is to start with the earlier scenarios, storage, identity, dev/tests. Then as you build trust, move on from there. And so, I will describe the scenarios in the order that people commonly use them. Because almost everyone has to build that trust before getting further and further into this brave new world of cloud computing.

Conclusion
We are done. Public cloud platforms, as I talked about for a while here, can provide lower cost and higher reliability for your infrastructure, and better support for applications. I would argue that at least one of these scenarios has value for every enterprise right now: infrastructure, applications, or both. And here is why I believe this. I believe this because I have done versions of this course to live audiences of IT leaders around the world. In every country, in every city, every time at this point I asked the audience, "Who in the room thinks "that at least one of these scenarios "has value for your organization right now? " You know what happens? Every country, every city, every time, every hand goes up. That's why I believe this. Because I talk with lots and lots and lots of especially IT leaders about these scenarios, about this change in our industry, and they tell me that these benefits are very real and that they can use these things right now. I bet that's true for you as well. So, my last comment, my last thought is this: What are you waiting for? I'm David Chappell, thanks for watching.