Post-processing and Cinematic Effects in UDK

Throughout these lessons, we will discuss using camera actors to shape player experience and also discuss techniques similar to those used in films. Software required: UDK (2012-10), Photoshop CS6.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
May 30, 2014
Duration
1h 24m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
May 30, 2014
Duration
1h 24m
Description

Throughout these lessons, we will discuss using camera actors to shape player experience and also discuss techniques similar to those used in films. Camera actors control the view the player has at all times and portray the events in the game. Many current generation games use cinematic tricks and techniques to sell the believability of the action and game play. By the end of this training, you should feel more comfortable adding post-processing and cinematic Eeffects in UDK. Software required: UDK (2012-10), Photoshop CS6.

About the author
About the author

Born and raised in Suffolk, Virginia, Clinton is currently a Environment Artist at Battlecry Studios located in downtown Austin, Texas.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
Hi, everyone. My name is Clinton Crumpler. I'm an environment artist at KIXEYE Game Studio located in San Francisco, California. More of my work can be found at my website, www. clintoncrumpler. com. In this course, we will discuss camera control and post-processing effects. Throughout these tutorials, we will discuss methods of creating camera movements and adjustments. Also, we'll learn how to control the view from the camera by setting up controlled volumes using post-processing to set mood and alter perception of the same scene. Some of the key points of this tutorial course will include learning how to create camera effects and movement, post-processing effects such as ambient occlusion and material effects, control volumes, and color grading. By the end of training, you'll be able to control how the player views and interacts with your level based on camera sequences and post-processing techniques. I'm excited to start and share with you these techniques, so let's jump right in the next video.

Post-processing and Cinematic Effects in UDK
To start out, I'm going to give you a quick rundown of the room that I've kind of constructed here, the level that you're going to be using that's going to be able to help you grasp from the principles we'll be talking about, and you can kind of use this is a demo room to kind of test out some principles and some volumes in different things we'll be working with thought this tutorial. First when you start out, you start within this room, which is kind of a camera room. So you can see here on the background screen, it's tracking our moment, as well as displaying it on an actual texture which is simulating a screen in the corner. Also, over here, we're getting the same kind of effect. So if I click on this button, the grid around this camera area turns off, but the camera's still following us, but the button also enables this secondary field, which you can see is kind of pulsating here right now, which is going to be a post-processing field. This is going to be a trigger volume that's going to allow us to change the post processing within this volume. We're going to talk about that a little bit too. This is going to be used for a little bit of color grading, in talking about how we can change how colors are received and translated through the UDK engine, moving onto here, you can see this is a room with some lights. We're going to be talking about how to do some blur effects. The same with over here, some depth of field and a couple of tricks with that, and this button over here if you hit E while near it, it controls the light switch. So you can turn that on and off and use that however you'd like. All that is run through Kismet, within the UDK engine, as well, and this last room is going to be used just for some basic camera techniques and just understanding the motion of the camera itself and a few other secondary effects. So let's go ahead is move on to the next section and get started.