Description
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 23, 2016
Duration
2h 47m
Description

Many helpdesk personnel don't have the tooling they need to solve their customers' problems. This course, Building a Client Troubleshooting Tool in PowerShell, will focus on developing a client-troubleshooting tool for helpdesk personnel. First you'll focus on how to recognize a problem that may require a new tool. Then you'll learn how to get to the heart of the problem by gathering requirements and speaking to the potential users to get a better idea of how you can build a tool to meet their needs. Once you gather that information, you'll learn how to build the tool via command-line code, design the GUI, and finally, wrap up with creating the GUI in Windows Forms with PowerShell Studio. By the time you finish this course, you will know how to use PowerShell to create a tool that will enable your clients to solve more problems and satisfy more of their customers.

About the author
About the author

Adam Bertram is an independent consultant, technical writer, trainer, and presenter. Adam specializes in consulting and evangelizing all things IT automation, mainly focused around Windows PowerShell.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello. This is Adam Bertram, independent consultant, Microsoft Cloud, and Data Center Management MVP, lover of PowerShell, and just all around awesome guy. I've been working with PowerShell for over seven years now, and I'm excited to go into a realm that many PowerShell scripters may not have gone yet, the GUI. This is why I'm happy to introduce you to my latest course, Building a Client Troubleshooting Tool in PowerShell. This is a course where we take a step back from the command line, and focus more on the user's graphical experience. Not only are we going to learn how to build an easy to use GUI application in PowerShell, but you'll also learn some softer concepts like design, and how to create a tool for others. We'll first focus on how to recognize a problem where someone else may be in need of a tool. This will entail tips on getting to the heart of the problem by gathering requirements, by speaking to the potential user of our tool to get a better idea of their day, their struggles, and how best our tool can help them. Once we have our marching orders we'll then go over how to build the tool via command line code. We'll then go into designing the GUI that will lay over our command line code, and then finally we'll wrap up with creating the GUI in Windows Forms with Sapiens PowerShell Studio.

Building the Core Tool Functionality
Hi. This is Adam Bertram, and this is the module, Building the Core Tool Functionality in my course, Building a Client Troubleshooting Tool in PowerShell. So you've worked with helpdesk staff to get some solid deliverables for the tool you'll be building for them. I gave you a sample scenario in the last module about a problem that my helpdesk staff was having. In this module we're now going to get down and dirty and get some PowerShell coding done. You'll notice, however, I make no mention of a GUI in this modules name. You know, it's simply building the core tool functionality. Why? Well it's because I'm considering a GUI another layer on a full solution here. First, we need to build the code for the GUI to execute behind the scenes. This is what we'll be focusing on in this module.

Designing a GUI with PowerShell
Hello. This is Adam Bertram, and this is the module, Designing a GUI with PowerShell in my course, Building a Client Troubleshooting Tool in PowerShell. An important step when building a full-fledged software application is designing the user experience. The user experience dictates if there's going to be even more frustration with this new tool or it's going to really help them be more productive, and make them much happier. In this module we're going to briefly cover some design considerations you should think about when building a GUI for anyone that just wants to point and click rather than to fool around with command line. For software and web developers building large applications a significant investment goes into the design step. Why? It's because it's super important how thousands of people experience a product. The interface is a huge part of the application as a whole, however, if you're building an Adhoc tool for just a few people that we're building in this course the design part really doesn't need to have a large focus at this point. This is why this module's going to be fairly small in comparison to the building module. It's important to not get caught up in perfecting the GUI. Focus on the code to get the job done first, and then on the GUI. Chances are the tool that you're building isn't going to require any whiz bang features anyway. Don't waste a ton of time making it flash and ding. Focus on the functionality first, and then, and only then you can implement more advanced GUI features that your help desk might be clamoring for.