Collaboration in Revit: Worksharing

This course describes what worksets are, how to set them up, how best to use them, and a number of management utilities to ensure a team can collaborate together effectively. Software Required: Revit.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 27, 2017
Duration
35m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 27, 2017
Duration
35m
Description

Have you ever needed to collaborate on a Revit project with multiple people? If so, this course, Collaboration in Revit: Worksharing, is perfect for you. First, you'll learn what worksets are, how to set them up, how best to use them, and a number of management utilities to ensure the team can collaborate together effectively. Then, you will learn about the library system of worksets, along with how to enable Worksharing, when to create additional worksets, and how to best use worksets utilities and management strategies. Finally, you'll learn how to detach from central and remove worksets. After watching this course, you'll understand all you need to know to effectively use worksets as part of a larger team. Software Required: Revit.

About the author
About the author

A born and raised Utahn, Kory discovered Revit in 2003 and has never looked back. He began working in Architecture right after high school and continued working through his undergrad in Business Management and then took two years to travel and study Architecture in Oxford.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, everyone. My name is Kory Cox, and welcome to my course, Collaboration in Revit: Worksharing. I am a senior designer at HDR, Incorporated, where I do design and BIM support in addition to using Revit for teaching and production. This course is designed to help you understand the worksharing functionality of Revit. This set of tools will allow more than one person to simultaneously edit a single design file. We will focus on helping you understand all of the tools that are available to use worksharing most effectively. Some of the major topics that we will cover include enabling worksharing with the creation of worksets within a central model, how and when to synchronize changes back to the central model, the creation of additional worksets, locking certain elements from editing by other users, and removing worksets from a work share file. By the end of this course, you'll know everything you need to enable you and your team to collaborate on a single model. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the basics of Revit, including the interface and navigating through the model using the ribbons and the Project Browser. From here, you should feel comfortable diving into documentation with my course on Revit essentials, annotation tools, or project documentation, or various courses on modeling available here on Pluralsight. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Revit with the Collaboration in Revit: Worksharing course, at Pluralsight.

Introduction to Worksharing
In this video series, we will be covering worksharing for Revit, a functionality which enables you to work in a large interdisciplinary team, all collaborating on a single file. This is different from traditional Revit where with one file only one member of the team can be working at any given time. In these videos, I'll be showing you how to set up the worksharing system, how to best utilize it, and some management strategies to ensure that your model operates at the highest efficiency possible. Working in a single file environment has some limitations, the most obvious of these is that only one member of the team can be working on the file at any given point in time. However, most design teams are larger than one person, and necessitate the use of worksharing to successfully complete the project. Worksharing operates on a library system, meaning that the central model is like the library, and any time a member of the team wants to change an object, they have to send a packet of information from their local machine to the central model. The central model then checks to see if that element is available. If it is, it checks it out to them, much like bringing a book home from the library. As long as that user holds that book, nobody else can change that element. However, if someone finds that they do need an element, and it belongs to someone, the element will tell them exactly who owns it, and then they can request that element be returned to the central model so that they, in turn, can take it out and make changes to it. With this system, it's possible to have 2, 3, 4, or perhaps even 10 members of the team working on the same file at the same time, all exchanging information in real time. And that's the power of Revit worksharing.