Revit: File Management Techniques for BIM Managers

This course will introduce you to some best practices and actions you can take to help keep Revit files working at their performance potential.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Feb 1, 2018
Duration
50m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Feb 1, 2018
Duration
50m
Description

Revit models get fast. As that complexity grows there are increasing opportunities for errors and file corruption. Users take shortcuts to create quick geometry, download questionable content from the internet, and insert myriad cad imports all in the name of efficiency. File size slowly creeps up and performance takes a beating until the file becomes complex completely unworkable. Perhaps to the point of being unable to even open the file. A properly managed file will never reach this point of failure. This video series is about the management techniques that can help you keep your Revit files in good health so that your team never notices a dip in performance.

About the author
About the author

A born and raised Utahn, Kory discovered Revit in 2003 and has never looked back. He began working in Architecture right after high school and continued working through his undergrad in Business Management and then took two years to travel and study Architecture in Oxford.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Kory Cox, and welcome to my course, Revit: File Management Techniques for BIM Managers. I am a senior designer at HGR Incorporated where I do design and BIM support in addition to using Revit for teaching and production. This course is designed to arm you with tools to keep your Revit files functioning at the best performance possible. While files will slow as they mature, when you complete this course, you will have a greater understanding of what affects file performance and what actions you can take to alleviate some of the problems that creep into Revit files as the team works. Some of the major topics that we will cover include the three elements of file performance, file fracturing strategies, external file management, and internal file management. By the end of this course, you'll know everything you need to keep your project running smoothly. Before beginning the course, you should be an intermediate user with some experience using the Revit platform and completing a few projects. This course is not designed for beginners, and some of the tools shown may cause harm if not used carefully. From here, you should feel comfortable diving into advanced functionalities of Revit with courses on scheduling, parametric design, incorporating high-fidelity BIM data, or learning how to edit the Revit API directly. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Revit with the File Management Techniques for BIM Managers course, at Pluralsight.

The Elements of File Performance & File Fracturing
Welcome to this video series where we will be discussing the strategies and management tools available to a BIM manager to ensure that your Revit files remain stable and in good order. This includes a discussion on the factors that can affect file performance, various methods for fracturing large Revit projects, efficient modeling techniques, and tutorials on essential, internal file management utilities. Years ago, I stumbled across a whitepaper released by Autodesk called Model Performance Technical Note. It is 29 pages of incredibly dry, but inexorably valuable insight into what affects file performance for Revit projects. The content of this video largely comes from this whitepaper, though I have picked up things from other industry resources over the years in my own research and in my own troubleshooting and file management experience. I will not be covering everything contained in that paper as it goes into greater depth on some of the material that we will be looking at, as well as setting out your hardware requirements to effectively run Revit. They release a new version every couple years or so, and I highly suggest doing a search on the Autodesk website to get ahold of the latest copy.