Advanced HVAC Duct Design in Revit MEP

Revit MEP is a powerful design tool. This course will teach you how to use the settings within Revit properly to create and evaluate your HVAC Design.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Dec 23, 2017
Duration
1h 51m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Dec 23, 2017
Duration
1h 51m
Description

At the core of designing a HVAC system is a thorough understanding of what goes into a MEP HVAC design. In this course, Advanced HVAC Duct Design in Revit MEP, you will learn the settings within Revit that you will need to adjust to create accurate loads. Next, you will see how to create and evaluate load calculations. And finally, how to apply your load information to a Ductwork layout. When you finish this course, you will have a detailed understanding of HVAC loads and HVAC design in Revit MEP that will help you to become more efficient in you design process. Software required: Revit MEP 2017.

About the author
About the author

Matthew Warren is the Engineering BIM Manager for BSA LifeStructures, a nationally recognized architecture, engineering, interior design, and planning firm. With a background in mechanical design as well as experience as a BIM expert for over 17 years, he has a passion for establishing standards and improving workflows within the firm to better serve clients. Matthew believes in finding new ways to use data and technology in order to establish a better built environment. Matthew focuses on educating others to leverage all the tools available in order to improve inter-office collaboration.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone. This is Matthew Warren, the Engineering BIM Manager at BSA Life Structures, and welcome to my course, Advanced HVAC Duct Design in Revit MEP. As many of us know, Revit is more than a 3D drafting tool. It's actually a complicated and sophisticated design tool, and this course is an in-depth look at the what, how, and why of HVAC design within Revit MEP. In this course, we will learn the interaction between MEP spaces and HVAC zones, the settings in Revit that affect your HVAC design, generating and comparing those HVAC loads, creating the ductwork layouts, and evaluating your ductwork design. And by the end of this course, you'll be able to create an HVAC ductwork design and have a solid understanding of everything involved for a successful design. But before beginning this course, it would be helpful to have a basic understanding of the Revit user interface and basic ductwork modeling experience. I hope you'll join me in this journey to learn HVAC ductwork design with the Advanced HVAC Duct Design in Revit MEP course at Pluralsight.

MEP Spaces
Hello, and welcome to MEP Spaces. This is Matthew Warren, an Engineering BIM Manager for BSA Life Structures. In this module, we're going to be covering what goes into placing an MEP space. We're going to be looking at the multiple ways to place an MEP space, importance of MEP space separators, your tagging of your MEP spaces, and MEP space parameters that you need to know about in order to edit for your HVAC loads. But before we get into Revit and start placing these MEP spaces, what exactly is an MEP space? MEP spaces are not architectural rooms. Though they're similar and they're related to one another, an MEP space is designed for the engineering and analysis of your Revit model. MEP spaces are specific to a phase in the model, which means they cannot be deleted nor can you see them through phase filter. And also, MEP spaces represent a specific area of the building that has the same thermal properties. So with this information, let's go ahead and launch Revit and start placing our MEP spaces.

HVAC Zones and Load Report
Hello, and welcome to HVAC Zones and Load Reports. This is Matthew Warren, the Engineering BIM Manager for BSA Life Structures. Within this module, we'll be covering how to create and generate HVAC zones along with preparing and generating the various types of load reports Revit has to offer. We will begin by placing and editing HVAC zones, we will also examine the relationship between HVAC zones and MEP spaces, and finally, we will edit and generate the various types of load reports from Revit. But before we open the model, let's look at what exactly is an HVAC zone? An HVAC zone is an area of the building that is controlled by one specific piece of mechanical equipment, whether that equipment is an air handler unit or a fan cooled unit or even just a residential furnace. Also, an HVAC zone can have anywhere from one MEP space to all the MEP spaces in a model assigned to it. And similar to MEP spaces, HVAC zones are phase specific, which means they can only be seen in the phase they were created in, and they cannot be demolished. So let's launch Revit and begin placing and editing our HVAC zones and generating the load reports associated to them.

Modeling the Ductwork System(s)
Hello, and welcome to Modeling the Ductwork Systems. This is Matthew Warren, the Engineering BIM Manager for BSA Life Structures. In the following module, we'll be learning how to define your ductwork and how Revit allows you to model your ductwork. And these two areas can be broken down to two additional areas each. And when defining your ductwork, there are duct systems and there are duct types, and when modeling your ductwork, you can use the generate Layout Tool that Revit provides, or you can manually route and size your ductwork. Looking at closer at duct systems and duct types, we will learn how these separate items work together to define your ductwork. And looking closer on how to layout ductwork, we will learn how the Generate Layout Ductwork Tool and the Manual Ductwork Tool work in tandem to effectively create your ductwork layout. So let's get started modeling your ductwork systems.

Checking the Ductwork System
Hello. This is Matthew Warren, the Engineering BIM Manager for BSA Life Structures, and welcome to the module, Checking the Ductwork System. Within this module, we'll learn how to check the static pressure of the ductwork system and the airflow velocity of the ductwork system and then learn how to show this data in reports and visually on plan views. Along with these reports, we're going to cover what has to be set up within the model for these reports to be generated properly, including checking the duct connector properties and inspecting your duct systems, thus allowing you to validate your ductwork system. So let's open Revit and begin inspecting our ductwork system so we can generate our reports.