Revit MEP Essentials: Family Creation Workflows

This course in intended to help those individuals who are creating their own Revit families. Whether it is the BIM manager to the engineer doing their own modeling. Software required: Revit 2016, AutoCAD 2016.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 14, 2016
Duration
2h 48m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 14, 2016
Duration
2h 48m
Description

Are you still getting vendors that only supply AutoCAD files for their families? Or did you find that one off vendor that is creating their components in Inventor? Or better yet you want to manipulate the out of the box families to fit your needs? Well in this course, Revit MEP Essentials: Family Creation Workflows, you'll learn how to create native Revit families using the MEP connectors. First, you'll take that 2D AutoCAD drawing and convert that to a Revit family. Next, you'll take the Inventor file through the BIM exchange so you can use those files and save them as a RFA file. Finally, you'll also learn how to export the family types into a catalog to keep the file size down. By the end of this course, you'll have a great grasp of how to navigate and create your own content for your projects. Required Software: Revit 2016, AutoCAD 2016.

About the author
About the author

I have been doing Revit MEP projects since 2006. I have been beta testing the Revit and Navis platform with Autodesk since 2011. In Beta testing had a chance to go back to Autodesk and with with the developers on how real world applications of the program should work.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Travis Beecher and welcome to my course, Revit MEP Essentials: Family Creation Workflows. I am a Senior BIM Engineer at Cn3D Construction, where we create fully coordinated BIM models for MEP systems. Revit is widely used by most of the MEP system engineering firms around the world, as well as a majority of the construction firms for clash coordination. In this course we're going to cover the basic fundamentals of family creation, creating MEP families with formulas and parameters, editing the out-of-the-box families for company standards, and adding final touches, such as clearance or maintenance zones and 3D model text for equipment tags. Some of the major topics that we will cover include, basic fundamentals of the family creation environment, applying formulas to drive our family sizes, creating the parameters for schedules. By the end of this course you will gain a great grasp of how to navigate and create your own content for your projects, as well as being able to manipulate the out-of-the-box items to better suit your needs. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with some type of 3D modeling environment. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Revit Family Creation with the Revit MEP Essentials: Family Creation Workflows course, at Pluralsight.

System Families, Project Families, In-place Families
Hello my name is Travis Beecher, I am a senior BIM engineer for a construction company based in Utah. In this course we'll be looking at Family Creation within the Revit platform, both within the family editor and in the family project environment. You might be asking yourself, why do I need to create custom families? What's the purpose? Manufactures create the contents for us, correct, and they'll give us an autocad file or a PDF file. And every once in a while, we're going to be getting an inventor file from certain contractors or suppliers. So let's go ahead and we'll take a look at different family types that you'll find within the project. We have a system family, these are the families that are built within the Revit environment, these include your walls, your pipes, your ducts, the conduits, the cable tray, those sort of items that we need to manipulate. Your loadable families, these are the main backbone of your projects, annotations, title blocks, air terminals, equipment that's going to be needed, these are going to be the most common. And then we had the in place families, these are unique elements to a specific project, we'll be covering these later.

Family Definitions
Now that we've looked at the different family types within the Revit program, let's go ahead and take a look at some different family definitions that we're going to be hearing throughout the rest of the course, and they're going to be vital to family creation. First thing up, we want to take a look at parameters, Instance. These are parameters that can be changed individually to the family within your project file. It only affects one family at a time. Type, these are parameters that will change the family globally within your project file. Change one, you change everything in the project.

Family Creations from Submittal
Now let's go ahead and take a look at Family Creation from Submittal, or a PDF from the internet. This is going to be critical for you if you're doing an LOD-450 for install and FAB so we know how big the piece of equipment is going to be and how much space it'll take up. So the first thing we need to take a look at is what is the purpose of this family, is it going to be taking up the actual space or do we just need a placeholder? Are we going to be breaking into a system like a valve, or is something going to be tying into this component like ductwork? Does it need to be host to a wall, ceiling or a floor? And how much detail is going to be needed for the family to be represented? Is it going to need to maintain flow for the calculations that we might be running throughout our program? All these are going to be vital questions that you're going to have to answer in order to create your family.

Inventor to Revit
Let's go ahead and take a look at the Inventor to Revit process. You're not going to get many Inventor files. The reason this is, is because they are so big, they model in every nut and bolt and spring because they send these to manufacturers to be created. So let's take a look at the Inventor to Revit steps. First off we've got to open the Inventor file, simplify our data, recognize the geometry, add or edit the system connectors, verify our data, and then we export that to an RFA file so we can open it in Revit. Depending on the size of file, this could take a little while.