Customizing Salesforce with Lightning Components: Getting Started

The Lightning Component Framework was used to completely redesign the Salesforce CRM product. In this course, you'll learn tips for how you can use that same framework to easily customize your own Salesforce org.
Course info
Rating
(43)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 10, 2017
Duration
2h 50m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introducing Lightning Development
Getting Started with Lightning Components
Working with Controllers and Data
Working with the Lightning Data Service
Using Lightning Components with Actions
Migrating from Visualforce to Lightning
Description
Course info
Rating
(43)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 10, 2017
Duration
2h 50m
Description

In this course, Customizing Salesforce with Lightning Components: Getting Started, you'll learn how to easily customize Salesforce with the new Lightning Component framework, which includes all the tools and technologies needed to build responsive and efficient components for any device. First, you'll cover the basics of building Lightning Components, and how to work with data using built-in components such as the Lightning Data Service. Next, you'll explore Lightning alternatives for the traditional JavaScript buttons that so many orgs have now. Finally, you'll learn about the most efficient way to migrate from Visualforce to Lightning. Although, many things have changed during the evolution of the Lightning Component framework, don't worry, you'll learn what you need to know to get up to "lightning" speed. By the end of this course, you'll be well on your journey towards customizing your org with Lightning components.

About the author
About the author

Sara Morgan Nettles is a Certified Salesforce Advanced Developer and Platform Developer I and II, who began her software development career twenty years ago working primarily with Microsoft technologies. She now focuses on bridging the gap between .NET and Salesforce and has written numerous books and articles, as well as being a regular speaker at Dreamforce

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone, My name is Sara Morgan Nettles and welcome to my course, Getting Started Customizing Salesforce with Lightning Components. I am a certified Salesforce advanced developer and platform one and two developer. I am also a senior developer at Synaptic AP where I work with a team of experts to deliver Salesforce based solutions in a variety of industries. This course is all about how developers like you can take the same tools and technologies used to completely redesign Salesforce's flagship CRM software and use them to customize and enhance your own Salesforce orgs. I am talking about the Lightning Component Framework which has gone through a lot of changes in the past few releases. If you happened to have checked out the framework when it was first introduced, then I am sure you will be pleasantly surprised to see some of the features that have been added recently. This course covers the basics of building Lightning components, how to work with data in your Salesforce org, using some of the built-in components such as the Lightning data service. Lightning alternatives for the traditional JavaScript buttons that so many orgs have now. And finally, some guidance on how best to migrate from Visualforce to Lightning. By the end of this course you'll feel comfortable working with the Lightning Component Framework and should have a good idea of some things that you can do right away to start customizing your own Salesforce org. Before beginning the course, you should be comfortable working with Salesforce, but if you're not then you'll find some excellent resources here on Pluralsight and the Apex Academy. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn all about the Lightning Component Framework with the Getting Started Customizing Salesforce with Lightning Components course at Pluralsight.

Getting Started with Lightning Components
Welcome back. In this module, we will jump right into developing Lightning components using Salesforce's online developer console. We will start out slow and make sure you understand all the basics of working with components, since they represent a very different way of developing in Salesforce. But now that we are all set up, we will create our first Hello World component bundle and go over some important things you need to know about using styling resources. We will then move on to what you need to do to make your components dynamic. And, finally, we will wrap up the module by talking about different ways to expose your components so that they can be used by tools, such as Lightning App Builder, and also be available through the Lightning experience or the Salesforce1 mobile app.

Working with Controllers and Data
Hi, this is Sara Morgan Nettles, and in this module, we are going to move beyond Lightning basics and the Hello World app, and build a component more typical of something you might want to create for your own Salesforce org. The open cases component will be for Salesforce1 mobile users. And this is a sneak peek of what it will look like. On the far left is the menu for Salesforce1, and at the top is a new item I have added called open cases. This is used to access the new component, which you see displayed in the middle. Rather than displaying all cases assigned to the logged in user, this component only shows those cases that are still open. It also allows the user to tap any of the cases and open up a detailed view of that case, which you see in the image on the far right. We will start out creating a new open cases component that uses a built-in component called record view to easily display a list of records. The JavaScript in the controller resource will call a server-side action in the form of an Apex method. Apex is the proprietary language that Salesforce uses to execute statements on the force. com platform. And since we need to access data, we will have to use Salesforce's query language, known as SOQL. We will also cover how to handle browser events, such as the tab that users will use to navigate to the detail record. And finally, how to manually expose our new component to all Salesforce1 users.

Working with the Lightning Data Service
Welcome back. In this module, I'm going to show you some exciting new features that were introduced in the winter '17 release, which have really been significant ones in my opinion. And to start it all off, we're going to walk through installing the beta version of the Force. com IDE for Eclipse, which offer support for creating Lightning bundles. We will then use the IDE to take a look at a component that uses an Apex controller and basic UI components to create new cases. But this will just be for reference purposes because what I'm going to show you in this module is how you can use some of the features released in winter '17 to really streamline and speed up your Lightning component development. We will begin by changing the Create Case Component so that it uses the new Lightning Data Service. Next, we will then preview what that looks like in the Lightning experience by creating a Lightning Quick Action, which is also something introduced in winter '17. And finally, we will replace the basic UI components with the latest and greatest Base Lightning Components, which I'm sure you're going to love as much as I do. So, let's get started.

Using Lightning Components with Actions
Hi, this is Sara Morgan Nettles, and in this module I'm going to address an issue that affects a lot of Salesforce customers, and that is that JavaScript buttons are not supported in Lightning. There are many orgs out there that have implemented hundreds of these buttons and the fact that they are not supported has been a major roadblock for upgrading to Lightning Experience for many of them. In this module, I'm going to begin by discussing what security concerns there are for JavaScript buttons, which is a big reason why they are not supported. I will then go over what Lightning alternatives can be used to replace any buttons you may already be using. We will then take a look at an example of a JavaScript button used to integrate with a partner web service, which is something that is commonly done by many Salesforce orgs. And then, I will show you just how easy it is to create a Lightning action alternative. And while we're at it, we will take a look at some helpful out of the box events that can be used by your Lightning actions.

Migrating from Visualforce to Lightning
Hi, this is Sara Morgan Nettles. And welcome to the last module, in which I will cover the things you need to know when migrating your org from Visualforce to Lightning. I will begin by briefly looking at various strategies for migration that you may want to consider. However, in this module we will only focus on one of those strategies, which is a gradual one in which you do not move from Visualforce to Lightning overnight, but rather carefully select which existing Visualforce pages you want to migrate, and then convert them in a way that allows you to support both Classic and Lightning users. This will involve taking a look at a Visualforce page that is currently hosted on the Home page of a Classic org. The first step will be to apply the Lightning Design System Styling, or SLDS. By using the SLDS, we can give the page the look of the Lightning Experience before we actually create the replacement Lightning Component. This strategy gives us a chance to first evaluate what markup changes are needed to get us to where we ultimately want to go, which is to create a Lightning alternative for the Visualforce page, one that will also be able to use the same Apex Controller. Finally, we will create a Lightning Out dependency app that allows the component to be used by both Classic and Lightning users.