SAP Business Warehouse Query Fundamentals

If you're a business analyst, controller, or developer who wants to create consistent reports and flexible analyses faster, this course is for you. You'll learn how to develop a prototype database, queries, and workbook in SAP Business Warehouse.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 4, 2016
Duration
2h 23m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 4, 2016
Duration
2h 23m
Description

Creating a business analysis often requires several days, and without the right tooling, it can be full of errors once it's finished. This course, SAP Business Warehouse Query Fundamentals, will teach you how to create analyses efficiently and accurately by showing you the fundamentals of creating SAP BW Queries in the Query Designer. We are going to build a BW based Excel workbook. I want you to follow the exercises, because you will be able to perform important tasks in the system. First, you'll be introduced to the Plan and Actual Sales Comparison Workbook that you'll develop throughout the course, learning how to develop the master data tables and infocube, as well as basic data warehousing concepts. Next, you'll work in the Query Designer, creating two different queries and setting properties and filters for each. Finally, you'll finish the column structure of your query and create virtual key figures for it. After watching this course, you'll be able to boost your analytical productivity and answer complex business questions based on the quality database of SAP Business Warehouse with ease.

About the author
About the author

Laszlo is an official certified SAP BW/BI consultant and trainer with over 10 years of IT experience. He specializes in SAP Business Warehouse/Business Intelligence but also enthusiastic about other solutions like ABAP, C# and new software practices.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Creating the Bookstore Database with the Data Flow Wizard
Hi. This is Laszlo Meszaros from Pluralsight. Welcome to the module about Creating the Bookstore Database with the Data Flow Wizard. Let's look at our roadmap. Shortly, we will implement our first milestone, the Bookstore Database. This milestone has two main steps, the categories and sales data. By following the tasks you will learn how to develop the master data tables, and an InfoCube. We will also generate data flows for the load with the Data Flow Wizard. This tool will speed up our development process. During this process we will learn the basic data warehousing concepts. SAP BW speaks a specific language. That's why it's hard to use it for the first time, but don't worry, I will clarify the most important terms. After watching this module you will be able to link the concepts to real examples. Our bookstore example helps. Okay, let's start with the basics.

Creating Simple Queries in the Query Designer
Hi. This is Laszlo Meszaros on Pluralsight. Welcome to the module about Creating Simple Queries in the Query Designer. Here is our roadmap again. It's good to see where we are now, and what are the next steps. We can take the Bookstore Database. The database is waiting for its first mission. It's waiting for the first queries. We can shift our focus to the queries and to the Query Designer. There are four main steps in the BW query layer of our plan. In this module we will be focusing on the first one. We will be creating our first simple queries. Simple doesn't mean simplistic. Through our simple query examples we will learn and practice the most important development tasks and settings in the Query Designer. After watching this module, you will be able to work with the Query Designer. Simple tasks like how to open it from the BEx Analyzer, how to create a query, save and test it will not be a question anymore. I will show you also how our data warehousing development looks like in the Query Designer. The module is demo focused. We will be creating two queries for our workbook, one for the chart and one for the table. During this we will learn the main workflow for a query. We will start with the filters. After that we will define the layout of our table. Then the properties come. There are many properties on different levels. All of them are for defining the behavior of our final query. We will be working with characteristic level, key figure level, and query level properties. All these tasks will be enough to develop the final query for the chart, and the first version of the table. Are you ready to start? Let's start our work with the query for the chart.

Creating New Columns with Virtual Key Figures
Hi. This is Laszlo Meszaros from Pluralsight. Welcome to the module about Creating New Columns with Virtual Key Figures. Let's turn back to our roadmap. We'll stay here now. We created two simple queries. The query for the chart is ready. The simple version of our table is also ready. We learned the process of creating a query and we know many properties, and we realize the problem. The simpler key figure column with characteristics is not enough. We need new columns, and we arrive to our next step in our roadmap. This step is about the query tools for creating new custom columns. I call these tools virtual key figures. What are the virtual key figures? Don't worry, I will explain them. I will also show you that there are two types of virtual key figures, the restricted and calculated key figures. You will understand what their differences are, and how to create them. More columns we create we will have a bigger table. I will also show you the display hierarchies for optimizing the size of the query table, and why is it important to keep the size compact, and of course, we will finish the column structure of our query. Let's clarify first what are the virtual key figures?