Sculpting Caricatures in ZBrush

Learn an artist-friendly workflow to sculpting caricatures and an array of practical techniques for exaggerating key characteristics, working with art direction, and capturing believable likenesses of your subjects in ZBrush. Software required: ZBrush 3.1 and up.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 1, 2008
Duration
6h 13m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 1, 2008
Duration
6h 13m
Description

Learn an artist-friendly workflow to sculpting caricatures and an array of practical techniques for exaggerating key characteristics, working with art direction, and capturing believable likenesses of your subjects in ZBrush. Provides over 6 hours of project-driven training for artists using ZBrush for sculpting and illustration. Popular highlights include: Exaggerating Key Features; Working with Subtool Master; Posing Models with Transpose Master; Merging Subtools; Creating Clothing using Topology; Redrawing Facial Topology; Blocking Out Geometry with ZSpheres; Creating Adaptive Skins; Projecting Detail into Adaptive Skins; Extracting Geometry to Create Accessories; Creating Layered Compositions; Painting with Depth; Painting over Composition; Sculpting Facial Features; Changing ZSphere Resolution; Working from Reference Art; Building Teeth and Eyes from Primitives; Appending Subtools; Painting Hair; Baking and Merging Layers. Software required: ZBrush 3.1 and up.

About the author
About the author

Justin thrives as a lead modeling author at Pluralsight. Growing up, Justin found a deep interest for the computer graphics industry after watching movies like Jurassic Park, Toy Story and The Abyss. His ambition would lead him to work at Sony Imageworks in Los Angeles on movies like Monster House and Surf's Up. Justin has also had numerous articles, tutorials and images published in 3D World and 3D Artist.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
[Autogenerated] hi and welcome to sculpting caricatures with zebras. Three Presented by digital tutors My name's Justin and I'll be your instructor as we build and sculpt the caricature of a famous actress, Cameron Diaz. Now, whether, as the subject of an editorial cartoon content for humor magazines or novelties at the local fair character has been around for many, many years. The caricature is the art of exaggerating characteristics when drawing a person for a variety of purposes, to be making political points mockery, or simply to capture the essence of a person in a fun little piece of art. So to begin, we'll take a look at some of the prominent facial features of Ms Diaz and how we can incorporate those into our peace than using Ze Brush will build the geometry and sculpted into an exaggerated likeness of the actress. We'll also use some painting and texture in techniques as well as to the illustration methods to create a finished image. Let's go ahead and begin by taking a look at a few examples of caricature throughout history, so that we can get a little bit better. Look at what we're going to be going for. So The first example we're gonna look at is by a man named Thomas Nast, and Thomas Nast was an editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and a lot of his caricatures and cartoons. We're meant to make sort of social and political statement. So that's one purpose that character can serve now, in this case, just visually looking at this, we can see that the facial features are not really that exaggerated. The entire head itself is kind of oversized and placed on this sort of small, exaggerated body. So that's where the exaggeration is taking place in this case, and take a look at the next one can see. Here's another _____ of Mark Twain, and in this one it's a little bit more exaggerated pose, and you've got the facial features definitely exaggerated a little bit more. You've got a lot of detail added around here to make a statement that he was going for all right. Another caricaturist is Al Hirschfeld. Now. His characters have a much different style. They're basically line drawings, and this is Albert Einstein. You can see that he's kind of taken a minimalist approach to how many lines can I use to really get the essence of that character so that you look at it. You know exactly who that is, right? Even without the blackboard and the equation, most people would probably recognize the Professor Einstein. And here is the crew of Star Trek you can see. Also, This is a very individualized style, very exaggerated in all of the facial features, but it's very flat, very to D black and white line art, but it really captures the essence of the people. And here's a self portrait of the artist can see very minimal, this little lines for the eyes and the eyebrows. Very nice and elegant caricatures all right. The next is more Drucker. You might recognize his art from things like Mad Magazine. It's a little bit more of a realistic style, but still exaggerated and see. It's got a supposed to the Hirschfeld. It's got some cross hatching and, ah, little bit more shading, and it's a little bit more detailed. But here's this caricature of George Lucas, and then we've got ah, Jack Nicholson. That's gotta really exaggerated head. This is by an artist named Dan Smith, Very exaggerated face, and it really gets into the pose and the attitude and tryingto portray that into the drawing rather than only the facial features. So you really get that kind of ah Nicholson's attitude there? Okay, so our goal is simply going to be to use E brush to create a three D caricature of some someone recognizable in this case, we're gonna use Cameron Diaz. Now, this is the artwork that we're gonna be using. This is kind of a two D guy that we're gonna be going by in addition to some photographic reference will be using just to kind of see Okay, how our eyes look how we're mouth looks. Where can we exaggerate what of the defining features of her face so that we can then exaggerate those. Okay, so we're gonna be using a particular person in this case, camera D s. But feel free to use your own subject, and ah, and use your own artwork and your own reference to be able to do that and just follow along in that way, feel free to do that as well. All right. So the first thing that we need to do is to create some rough geometry in ze brush as a basis for our creation. Now we can do this using ze spheres, and we'll start to go through that process in the next lesson.