Securing Windows 10: Data at Rest, in Use, and in Transit

Prevent your data from leaking and minimize threats to your data's security. In this course, you will learn about how leaks occur and the software and hardware tools available within Windows 10 that can help mitigate any security risks.
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 10, 2016
Duration
1h 49m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 10, 2016
Duration
1h 49m
Description

Security threats will never go away; in fact, they are becoming more prevalent than ever. So, how do you mitigate security risks in this day and age? The answer? Windows 10. The new hardware and software capabilities unleashed will help protect your data from modern threats, and ultimately provide a secure environment. In this course, Securing Windows 10: Data at Rest, in Use, and in Transit, you will learn how to protect your data at any stage. First, you'll examine how data can leak and how to use BitLocker to protect your resting data. Next, you'll cover Dynamic Access Control from a client perspective and how to prevent co-mingling in your Windows data. Finally, you'll learn how to use the Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol (SSTP) and its VPN functionality as well as the client functionality of RMS encryption to secure data in transit. By the end of this course, you'll be able to secure your own data from multiple kinds of risks and attacks.

About the author
About the author

Mark has trained and / or consulted in 20 countries since 1999, after retooling himself as an IT admin in the Windows NT 4.0 era at a local college. He has taught students at various Microsoft and Symantec campuses and at a variety of academic, military, corporate, and training center locations as well as online. He is the lead singer in three rock bands he founded, sings jazz, does voice overs, and has dabbled in stand-up and improv.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Mark Ingram. Welcome to my course, Securing Windows 10: Data at Rest, in Use, and in Transit. I am an online and offline trainer and consultant, working with a large variety of Microsoft server and client technologies. In this course, we're going to look at various ways that data can leak, regardless of whether it's on a server, you're actively using it, or it's being transmitted. Knowing what tools are available and how to use them can help mitigate any security risks to save you a lot of hardship in the long run. That being said, before beginning this course, you should be familiar with how to grant access to resources using NT of S and share permissions. Some of the major topics we'll cover include new BitLocker protection features, how UEFI, the modern replacement for BIOS, enables new hardware-based protection methods such as secure boot and device guard, how Enterprise Data Protection prevents confidential information from leaving your organization, accidentally or otherwise, and a couple of Enterprise technologies from the Windows 10 client perspective that give you greater control over who can do what, namely active directory rights management services and dynamic access control. By the end of this course, you'll know how to protect data drives using Windows 10, how to protect your drives from malicious code installing before startup and from various other attacks, and how to protect data from inadvertently leaving your organization. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn a huge variety of software and hardware security features available to you using Windows 10 with the Securing Windows 10: Data at Rest, in Use, and in Transit course at Pluralsight.

Examining Ways That Data Can Leak
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Mark Ingram. This is Securing Windows 10: Data at Rest, in Use, and in Transit. Security threats are becoming more prevalent on a daily basis. You're boss is concerned, therefore you need to be concerned. You work an organization that has highly regulated data security requirements. You need to start thinking about all the ways data can leak. Wherever it's being used, at rest, in use, and in transit. Here's how we'll break that down in the coming modules, so you get the whole story about data protection. We'll have modules for how to protect data at rest. How to protect data in use. And finally, how to protect data when it's on the move. In this module we will have quick tour of a variety of technologies, a little sneak peek of what we're going to be covering in-depth later on in the course. Various ways to protect your data, not just with software on Windows 10 and the Windows Server environment, but also with some modern hardware features.

Protecting Data in Use
In this module, we'll look at various ways of protecting data in use in our Windows 10 environment. We have three sections in this module. The first is on Enterprise Data Protection, which is a great way of saving users from themselves. Device Guard is a hardware-based solution for running only trusted apps in our environment. Finally, we'll look at Dynamic Access Control, which gives us a more flexible way of granting access to file shares compared to the old NTFS and shared permissions approach.

Protecting Data in Transit
In this module we'll look at protecting data in Transit. We have three sections. First we'll talk about Active Directory Rights Management Services how that gets us a layer of information rights management that gives us an extra way of restricting what users can do with the content beyond the usual sharing NTFS permissions this is an additional layer of security. Then we'll talk about SSTP the Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol. The advantages here is that it's a well known port that's probably already opened through your firewall that it utilizes. Finally we'll cover DirectAccess from a client perspective and how it's extremely easy in fact it's zero touch from a client perspective.