SharePoint Server 2013 Core Solutions (70-331) Part 1

Part 1 of 3 in the SharePoint Server 2013 Core Solutions (70-331) series covers a range of topics including the installation and management of SharePoint 2013, PowerShell, data management, and more.
Course info
Rating
(384)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 6, 2013
Duration
4h 4m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(384)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 6, 2013
Duration
4h 4m
Description

Part 1 of 3 in the SharePoint Server 2013 Core Solutions (70-331) series covers a range of topics including the installation and management of SharePoint 2013, PowerShell, data management, and more. This course is designed for those who already have a basic understanding of SharePoint, Windows administration, and Active Directory concepts.

About the author
About the author

Christopher Harrison is a Microsoft Certified Trainer, focusing on SharePoint and SQL Server. He's the owner and Head Geek at GeekTrainer, Inc.

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More courses by Christopher Harrison
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Installing SharePoint 2013
Having covered the basics of SharePoint and the major moving parts it's now time to turn our attention to doing the installation of SharePoint. Now, what we're gonna see is the basic requirements in order to install SharePoint. Both from the hardware, software, and user account perspective then we're gonna take a look at doing our installation interactively. We'll talk about the different steps that need to take place and then we're gonna polish it all off by talking a little bit about how to automate installation.

SharePoint Service Applications
In this lesson we wanna turn our attention to SharePoint Service Applications. Now one of the things I wanna mention right up front is that my goal here is not to talk about specifics of certain service applications. That one of the things that you're gonna notice about service applications is sort of like a snowflake, no two are alike. That while there's going to be a lot of commonality, a lot of common ground, and a lot of different things that our service applications are going to share in common, you are gonna notice that there's going to be a lot of differences between them as well. However, the underlying architecture and the basic concepts are gonna be the same. So before we start delving into specific service applications later on in the course, it behooves us to stop and take a look at the architecture that's going to make the magic of SharePoint Service Applications work.

External SharePoint Components
One of the biggest improvements in SharePoint 2013 is the offloading of a couple of very important, very big components. And the reason that these components have been offloaded is so that way we can better share these between other services and also give us the flexibility to be able to update them without having to update the SharePoint farm as well. And that's what we're gonna take a look at in this lesson of external SharePoint components. In particular, the two big components that we're going to take a look at are our Office Web Apps, which as we're gonna see will enable editing of Office documents through a browser, and then the Workflow Manager, which will give us the ability to offload the workflow processing.

Web Application Address Management
When managing web applications, one of our biggest concerns is the URLs and addresses that our users are going to use to connect to these web applications. We may need to add in multiple addresses that our users could use to connect to our applications. We may need to go in and modify the different starting points for site collections, or we may even want the ability to set up our site collections to have a host name for themselves. That's exactly what we want to take a look at in this lesson.