SOLIDWORKS Essentials - Basic Drawings

Learn how to create 2D drawings for manufacturing and documentation of 3D parts in SOLIDWORKS. Software required: SOLIDWORKS 2016.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 2, 2016
Duration
29m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 2, 2016
Duration
29m
Description

Although SOLIDWORKS allows parts to be designed in 3D, typically 2D drawings are required for manufacturing. This course will explain how to use SOLIDWORKS's drawing tools to create these 2D drawings quickly and accurately. Software required: SOLIDWORKS 2016.

About the author
About the author

Jamie Kalb is an Application Engineer at GoEngineer supporting SOLIDWORKS and 3D printing. He regularly teaches classes on both basic and advanced usage of SOLIDWORKS. He has been involved in robotics for over 7 years, and has over 8 years of experience with SOLIDWORKS and CSWP certification.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Intro to Drawings
I'm Jamie Kalb, an application engineer at GoEngineer, and this is the first in a series of video tutorials about basic drawings in SOLIDWORKS. In this module, I'll explain what a drawing is and the basic steps to create one. We'll start out with some theory and then move into a hands-on tutorial building up a drawing from an already completed CAD model drawings. In the industry, the word drawing might be used to refer to many different things ranging from a quick two-dimensional hand sketch to a detailed engineering drawing to even a full three-dimensional CAD model. But SOLIDWORKS has a very specific definition. Drawings in SOLIDWORKS are 2D representations of 3D parts, usually produced for documentation and manufacturing. These drawings are parametrically linked to the original model, which means that changes to the original model will be reflected on the drawing automatically. Why do we make drawings? SOLIDWORKS is a tool for designing parts in three dimensions, and the designer can view those parts in 3D. But not everybody who needs to understand the design has the same 3D tool, so we lay out the relevant details in a 2D file format that everyone should be able to open, typically a PDF, or print them on paper. SOLIDWORKS has built-in functionality to easily create these 2D drawings from an existing 3D model rather than drawing them manually. There's also some ability to drive changes to the 3D model from the drawing as well.

Types of Drawing Views
In the previous module, we created a very basic SOLIDWORKS drawing with standard views. In this module we'll first set up some drawing templates and then explore more options for other types of views, including section views, detail views, and broken views. We'll begin a more complex drawing that we'll be building up through the rest of this video series.

Dealing with Part Configurations
Configurations in SOLIDWORKS are a convenient way to represent different versions of a part within the same file. For example, if your part was an asymmetrical tool, you could have a right hand and a left hand configuration of it. Each configuration is essentially the same part, but with some tweaks ranging from change dimensions to added features. SOLIDWORKS has a few neat tricks for dealing with configurations on drawings. In this video, we'll explore how to add sheets to the drawing, change the configurations shown in any particular view, and link a drawing note to the configuration name.

Dimensions
In SOLIDWORKS, all of a part's geometric information is held in the Part File. That's where all of the dimensions are stored, and drawing views are simply windows to that model. So we won't be creating new dimensions on the drawing, but we want to show certain dimensions on the drawing for documentation or quick reference during manufacturing. SOLIDWORKS has a number of tools for showing dimensions on the drawing, and in this module we'll explore how to use those tools to automatically show some dimensions, manually add others, and customize how those dimensions are displayed.

Annotations
Sometimes dimensions alone won't be sufficient to communicate a part's design. Drawing views might require a little more markup to clarify things like locations and dimensions, symmetry, or details about manufacturing. In this module, we'll explore SOLIDWORKS' Annotation tools, placing annotations for datum features, surface finishes, center marks, center lines, hole callouts, and even some very basic geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.