SQL Server Application Development Best Practices

Relational databases like SQL Server are powerful and complex systems. This course will teach you everything you need to know to get excellent performances from SQL Servers, including how to diagnose performance problems, and more.
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 18, 2018
Duration
3h 29m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Do We Still Need to Think in SQL?
Is a SQL Database Just a Store?
Can We Get Good Performances from SQL Server?
Are Relational Databases Obsolete?
Can You Get Predictable Performances from SQL Server?
Description
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 18, 2018
Duration
3h 29m
Description

Relational databases like SQL Server are powerful and complex systems, and you need to know how to work with them to get the best out of them. In this course, SQL Server Application Development Best Practices, you will learn what you need to do to get excellent performances from SQL Servers. First, you will learn how SQL Server works and how to think like SQL. Next, you will see how to diagnose performance problems, how to solve those problems the SQL way, and how to choose between SQL and NoSQL. Is NoSQL worth the change? You will have the right arguments to decide. Finally, you will discover how to get predictable performances from SQL Server. When you’re finished with this course, you will have the skills and knowledge needed to improve the way you work with SQL Server.

About the author
About the author

Rudi Bruchez is a freelance consultant and trainer based in Paris, France. He has more than 15 years of experience with SQL Server and started to venture into NoSQL territories. As SGBD evolve into more complex solutions, he tries to make sure that people understand the fundamentals and implement their databases wisely.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone! My name is Rudi Bruchez, and welcome to my course, SQL Server Application Development Best Practices. I am a SQL Server consultant and trainer from Paris, France. But you get that from my accent, right? In 20 years, I have seen a lot of shops working with SQL Server. It gave me the material for this course. If you have questions about SQL or NoSQL databases, if you are using Entity Framework, and you get performance problems, or you want to work best with SQL Server, this course is for you. This course is about getting accustomed to what SQL Server and the relational SQL database is really--a great a great piece of software. So we will see why SQL is a smart language that took the right approach to what's manipulating data. We will talk about sharing responsibilities between Entity Framework and SQL Server, how to diagnose and solve performance problems, how to choose between SQL and NoSQL, and, finally, how to access performances before going to production. By the end of this course, you will be able to use these real-world best practices and build on them to get better performances and more flexibility with SQL Server. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with SQL Server, the SQL language, and. NET development. Nothing too advanced. I'm just assuming you have some experience programming SQL Server with. NET, and you have questions that this course is designed to help you answer. I hope you will join me on this journey to learn SQL application development best practices at Pluralsight.

Is a SQL Database Just a Store?
Welcome to the next module of this course named SQL Server Application Development Best Practices. Now we ask ourselves a strange question, Is a SQL database just a store? And by that, I mean, is it just a bucket where we just put our data and we get it back to do something interesting with it later? It seems to be the most common belief these days seeing the way the databases are used every day in programming projects. To get more perspectives on the subject, we will explore a little bit how SQL Server works. We want to know what's inside the box, how SQL Server is built and what kind of functionalities it offers for working with our data. You might guess we will discover that SQL Server is a bit more than just a store. Let's say we can do a lot of things with SQL Server. So now the question is, Should we do it? We have some design decisions to make. Should we put the application logic, the business logic, on the business layer, separated from the database, or could we venture into storing this application logic into stored procedure for instance? No, no! Nobody would do that! And on the client side, how to access SQL Server? We have seen that we might have an impedance mismatch problem using raw SQL statements inside strings. So the obvious solution would be to use an object relational mapping library like Entity Framework. It's a great tool, but we will see how to use it wisely. On the server-side, what about stored procedures? This is a heated debate between ad hoc query proponents and stored procedure advocates. Would we be able to decide once and for all in this module? Crossing fingers.

Can We Get Good Performances from SQL Server?
In this module named Can We Get Good Performances from SQL Server? , we will help the Pachadata developers improve their work with SQL Server using what we learned in the first two modules. The Pachadata developers are are eager to embrace the relational database system mottos, which are, as we know, Thank declaratively, not imperatively, think set oriented, think relational, think mathematic operations, not procedures, but that's frustrating because you need to know what SQL can really do, and how to go about solving different kind of problems you have daily in your programming duties. The goal of this module is to find real-world solutions to real-world problems, and to see how that works for performances. This is based on my personal experience with production challenges I have come across many times. I think it will show you a good way of addressing and thinking about SQL Server code optimization, how to think like SQL.