Practical SQL Server High Availability and Disaster Recovery

Supporting high availability and disaster recovery are without a doubt some of the most fundamental skill-sets necessary to being a successful senior level DBA. Whether you work in a multi-million dollar enterprise or a “strapped for cash” start-up, this course will compare and contrast the many features, techniques, and concepts available in SQL Server to meet your individual needs.
Course info
Rating
(92)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 30, 2015
Duration
4h 40m
Table of contents
Understanding High Availability vs. Disaster Recovery
Getting Familiar with the Transaction Log
Taking Backups and Implementing Log Shipping
Setting up Failover Clustering
Supporting Legacy Mirrors
Installing and Supporting AlwaysOn Availability Groups
Understanding Additional Approaches
Bringing It All Together
Description
Course info
Rating
(92)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 30, 2015
Duration
4h 40m
Description

Congratulations, you’re the DBA. Along with all the rights, privileges, and prestige that comes with that. It also means you are responsible for not only the uptime and guaranteed availability of your database servers but also the ability for any of those servers to quickly recovery from any disaster imaginable. Supporting these two areas are without a doubt some of the most fundamental skill-sets necessary to being a successful senior level DBA. This course will compare and contrast the many features, techniques, and concepts available in SQL Server that will meet your individual needs whether you work in a multi-million dollar enterprise or a “strapped for cash” start-up.

About the author
About the author

Currently an IT leader in Denver Colorado's financial sector Russ has focused on database development, modelling, administration, and BI since 1997 across the Microsoft stack. Russ is a passionate trainer and SQL community volunteer presenting regularly at PASS SQL Saturday events and local user groups around the US.

More from the author
More courses by Russ Thomas
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Getting Familiar with the Transaction Log
Hey! Welcome to module 2 of Practical SQL Server High Availability and Disaster Recovery. Once again, this is Russ Thomas at sqljudo. com and Twitter @sqljudo. With the endless supply of subject matter surrounding SQL Server, what do I as a veteran DBA think is one of the most critical things that you can understand prior to beginning a study of HA and DR? Pretty easy, actually. It's the transaction log. In this module, we'll do a quick introduction to some of the foundational aspects of the purpose, function, and operation of the SQL Server transaction log. Having a good familiarity with what is going on inside the log will make the rest of our topics much more palatable. This is because there is literally no HA or DR feature within SQL Server that doesn't rely heavily on the operation and management of the transaction log. On one hand, one of the major responsibilities and purposes of a sound HA or DR implementation is to protect and support the SQL Server transaction log. After all, without a healthy log, your database is basically unusable. Failing from a healthy database server to another location where the database has become suspect due to a corrupt or missing log doesn't serve anyone any purpose. On the flip side, nearly all approaches to high availability and disaster recovery leverage some of the very same internal mechanisms and operations that the transaction log itself uses to work at all.

Taking Backups and Implementing Log Shipping
Welcome to module 3 of this Pluralsight course on High Availability and Disaster Recovery. This module is Taking Backups and Implementing Log Shipping. My name is Russ Thomas on the web at sqljudo. com and Twitter @sqljudo. We'll move now from our dive into the transaction log into the first true disaster recovery topic of this course starting with taking backups. You'll find as we cover this topic that a good understanding of the transaction log can make all the difference in understanding backups and all your options with regards to taking backups. In this module, we'll cover backups from the standpoint of the three different recovery models offered by SQL Server--the simple recovery model, the full recovery model, and the bulk logged recovery model. Once we've covered backups in general, we'll talk about a clever way to keep your standby server up to date and nearly in sync with your primary server through a technique known as log shipping. You'll see that log shipping is a great choice for meeting disaster recovery requirements for literally any version, size, or licensing level of SQL Server. We'll also finally get into some real demos and case studies as they relate to the data here at Abacos.

Understanding Additional Approaches
Welcome back to this Pluralsight course. This is module seven, Understanding Additional Approaches. Again, this is Russ Thomas on the web at sqljudo. com and Twitter @sqljudo. In this module, we're going to talk about a few other options you have for protecting SQL Server data. We're going to start with looking at virtualization. Virtualization offers us some incredible benefits for easing the management of many, many servers by putting a lot of your guests on a single virtual host. This reduces total need of servers, total need of infrastructure, and can reduce costs significantly, so it is really popular among the C-level staff. What does it offer us as the SQL Server DBA's, however, in the form of high availability or disaster recovery? We're going to then look at SQL Server in the cloud. Some of this is very, very similar to what we have in virtualization, but we also get some new options in the cloud with offerings such as SQL Azure. And then what about some SQL Server hybrid solutions? I'm kind of showing my hand here when I use the term hybrid solutions. What we're going to look at is transactional replication, a long-standing feature of SQL Server that has some very good uses. We're going to look at using a transactional replication solution as both what transactional replication is meant for and a solution in the realm of high availability and disaster recovery. And then finally we'll close up just taking a glance at if there's any other options out there on the market outside of Microsoft SQL Server or Microsoft specific technologies that can give us high availability or disaster recovery options.

Bringing It All Together
Welcome to the last module in this Pluralsight course on SQL Server high availability and disaster recovery. This is module eight, Bringing It All Together. For the last time, this is Russ Thomas. I'm on Twitter @sqljudo and the web at sqljudo. com. Tackling disaster recovery and high availability from a big picture angle is a pretty massive topic. If you've gone through each of these modules one-by-one, I really do congratulate your patience and dedication to your career as a DBA. But even if you just picked and chose topics here and there, I hope you came away with the concepts and skills that you were looking for. The primary goals of this course was to first provide you with sound foundational understanding of ACID compliance, the relational rules and boundaries that ensure each transaction either completes or does not complete, no half work done here, is isolated from all the other transactions and is durable and how those ACID features are ensured by the transaction log. With an understanding of the transaction log, you're in a great place to understand how pretty much every feature within SQL Server that affects high availability or disaster recovery runs. And with that, you can then define your companies SLAs, the service level agreements, that are realistic and compatible with the solutions at your disposal. As for those solutions at your disposal, well, as you've seen, there are more than a few, and in this final module let's recap each of the previous topics in a way that hopefully shows how each works, but also how each can work together. We'll review the full enterprise setup that we have here at Abacos.