SQL Server: Implementing a Hybrid Cloud Solution in Azure

The course will show you how to create, manage, and scale Azure VMs for SQL Server workloads, implement Azure SQL Database, and work with them from your on-premises SQL Server for a complete Hybrid SQL Server solution.
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 8, 2017
Duration
2h 19m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction
Understanding Azure IaaS
Understanding Hybrid Solutions
Understanding How to Create and Manage Azure VMs
Migrating Databases to Azure VMs and Scaling
Understanding Azure SQL Database and Stretch Databases
Monitoring Options with Azure Portal and SSMS
Description
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 8, 2017
Duration
2h 19m
Description

Have you been wondering what Azure Virtual Machines or Azure SQL Databases are and what they mean for you as a production DBA or developer? The Azure platform has become an Enterprise-worthy environment that can provide Infrastructure as a Service and a database Platform as a Service. In this course, SQL Server: Implementing a Hybrid Cloud Solution in Azure, you'll learn the fundamentals of Azure virtual machines and Azure SQL Database from a DBA perspective. First, you'll start with an overview of what the Azure platform encompasses and then dive straight into how to connect and configure your Azure environment. You'll then learn about VM networking, storage, configuration management, images and disk, monitoring, deploying workloads, and scaling. Next, you'll explore Azure SQL Database and Stretch Database, including how to configure networking and security, discuss features, migration methods, and scaling. Finally, you'll discover methods for monitoring using the Azure Portal or Management Studio. When you've finished this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge to implement a Hybrid SQL Server solution leveraging Azure. If you've been considering extending your SQL Server environment to Azure, this course is for you!

About the author
About the author

Tim is a Principal Consultant with SQLskills. He has worked with SQL server for the past 15 years, in a variety of roles including DBA, Lead DBA, and multi-department manager, which have given him extensive experience planning and implementing large-scale environment changes and upgrades.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello, my name is Tim Radney, and welcome to my course, SQL Server: Implementing a Hybrid Cloud Solution in Azure. I am a SQL Server consultant with SQLskills, as well as a Microsoft Data Platform MVP. As a consultant who works a lot with Azure, I've been fortunate to help numerous companies incorporate Microsoft Azure into their environment. More and more organizations are realizing that leveraging Microsoft Azure is a low cost and easy-to-implement solution for scaling their organization or building out a disaster recovery site. This course will give you a deeper understanding of what Azure Infrastructure as a Service consists of. Azure is vast, and includes just about everything an organization needs to run their operations fully in the cloud. You'll learn about the parts of Infrastructure as a Service that apply to building and scaling out hybrid SQL Server solutions, including backup to URL, managed backups, stretch database, availability groups, Azure SQL Database, and Azure virtual machines. If you've been curious how to build and scale out Azure virtual machines, this course will help to eliminate any fears or concerns on being able to do just that. You'll learn about the prerequisites for creating virtual machines, and several options of being able to scale out storage, CPU, and memory. You'll also learn about migration strategies, including several methods of getting your on-premises SQL Server instances and databases into Azure virtual machines. The course also looks at Azure SQL Database and discusses some of the top features built into the product, as well as taking a deep dive into stretch databases. Lastly, you'll learn about the various ways to monitor systems in Azure, including the various dashboards built into the Azure portal, as well as SQL Server Management Studio. I hope you'll join me as we explore extending on-premises solutions into Azure in this course, SQL Server: Implementing a Hybrid Cloud Solution in Azure, Here on Pluralsight.

Understanding Azure IaaS
Hi, this is Tim Radney from SQLskills. com, and I am recording this course for Pluralsight. This course is about SQL Server: Implementing a Hybrid Cloud Solution in Azure, and this is the Understanding Azure Infrastructure as a Service module. In this module, I am going to step you through the Azure Marketplace, and discuss the various offerings available to you. Next I'm going to do a deeper dive into compute, storage, databases, monitoring and management options that you can choose from within the Azure Marketplace, and we'll wrap up this module discussing Azure Active Directory and various benefits of using Azure Active Directory integration. The Azure Marketplace is your go-to spot for any new items that you need. Think of this as your app store. You get to the Azure Marketplace within the Azure Portal. If you have an Azure subscription, once you log into the portal and click Add, you are then in the Marketplace. Within the marketplace, there are over a dozen categories to choose from; items such as compute, storage, networking, and many, many more. Most provisioning that you can do within the marketplace can also be done via PowerShell. This comes in handy when you need to spin up similar systems or development and QA type environments on a regular basis.

Understanding How to Create and Manage Azure VMs
Hi, this is Tim Radney from SQLskills. com. This course is about SQL Server: Implementing a Hybrid Cloud Solution in Azure, and this is the Creating and Managing Azure VMs module. In this module, I am going to discuss various considerations that you need to take into consideration when working with Azure virtual machines. I'll start by discussing the various networking components available to you, and then discuss the various storage options. Getting your storage right the first time will be very important, since I/O is our typical bottleneck for SQL Server. I'll then take you through the steps of creating an Azure virtual machine, explaining all of the items you will need to have, and then I will demo going through the Azure Portal to create a virtual machine with SQL Server already installed, as well as making some post installation configuration changes. I'll wrap up the module with explaining the benefits and the how-tos around extending an on-premises availability group to an Azure virtual machine. Networking is something that needs to be thought about and planned before you start building out your Azure environment. Since we are dealing with a virtualized cloud environment, we have the ability to create VNets, which are virtual networks. Multiple VNets can be created so that you can isolate different systems into different environments. For example, if you wanted to isolate a particular application and all of its servers into an isolated network, you can further divide your network by using different subnets. As an organization starts creating different VNets, in a lot of cases, systems or processes within different VNets need to communicate with each other. VPNs will have to be set up between VNets to allow them to communicate. As you can tell, the networking side of working with Azure, or really any new environment, can be complicated. It is much better to work with your networking team to get all of this configured before you start trying to create virtual machines or using Azure SQL Databases.

Migrating Databases to Azure VMs and Scaling
Hi, this is Tim Radney from SQLskills. com, and I am recording this course for Pluralsight. This course is about SQL Server: Implementing a Hybrid Cloud Solution in Azure, and this the Migrating Databases to Azure VMs and Scaling module. In this module, I am going to discuss several different methods that you can use for migrating databases to Azure virtual machines, and some of the scalability options that are available to you for Azure virtual machines. One of the simplest and safest methods to migrate your databases from on-premises to an Azure virtual machine is a backup and a restore. Getting data from on-premises to Azure Storage has been made easy with URL-based backups. Backing up directly to Azure Blob storage in the region that your Azure virtual machine is in, will get you your database backups into the cloud for a timely restore to your VM. What is great with this method is that you can pre-stage a recent full backup and only have to apply a differential and a few lock values to get current and go live in the new environment. Another option, and this one is more of my preferred method, is to backup local, copy to Azure Blob storage, and then perform your restores. It is the same concept as Backup to URL, however, you are responsible for getting your data to the URL, which is Azure Storage. I like this method better so that I can still retain a local copy of my backup. The same rules apply to being able to restore full ahead of time with no recovery, and then just rolling the logs forward at cutover time. SQL Server Managed Backup to Microsoft Azure manages and automates SQL Server backups to Microsoft Azure Blob storage. You can choose to allow SQL Server to determine the backup schedule based on the transaction workload of your database, or you can use Advanced Options to define a schedule. SQL Server managed backup to Microsoft Azure supports point-in-time restore for the retention period specified.