SQL Server: Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database

Azure SQL Database is finally on a par with on-premises SQL Server! This course describes and demonstrates using Azure SQL Database and its features as well as migration strategies for migrating existing SQL Server databases to Azure SQL Database.
Course info
Rating
(40)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 19, 2017
Duration
2h 8m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction
Understanding Azure SQL Database Features
Exploring Unsupported Features
Understanding Azure SQL Database Pricing
Migrating Data to Azure SQL Database
Monitoring and Tuning Azure SQL Database
Description
Course info
Rating
(40)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 19, 2017
Duration
2h 8m
Description

Have you been wondering what Azure SQL Database is and what it means for you as a production DBA? Azure SQL Database has become an Enterprise-worthy database platform that provides relational database-as-a-service. In this course, SQL Server: Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database, you'll learn the fundamentals of Azure SQL Database from a DBA perspective. First, you'll learn what Azure SQL Database is at a high level and then dive straight into the numerous features, many of which were finally introduced in the box version of SQL Server 2016. Next, you'll explore some of the unsupported features to show the differences between the on-premises SQL Server product and Azure SQL Database. Then you'll learn about the various pricing structures as well as different methods for migrating on-premises data to Azure SQL Database. Finally, you'll dig into the methods for monitoring and troubleshooting performance in Azure SQL Database. After watching this course, you should have a solid understanding of Azure SQL database and its many features and capabilities.

About the author
About the author

Tim is a Principal Consultant with SQLskills. He has worked with SQL server for the past 15 years, in a variety of roles including DBA, Lead DBA, and multi-department manager, which have given him extensive experience planning and implementing large-scale environment changes and upgrades.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello, my name is Tim Radney, and welcome to my course, SQL Server: Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database. I am a SQL Server consultant with SQL skills, as well as a Microsoft data platform MVP. And when I attended the fall SQL Intersection conference in 2015, I got really excited about Azure SQL Database. SQL Database had been available for quite awhile; however, it was finally comparable to on-premises SQL server. Azure SQL Database is Microsoft's relational database cloud solution. In this course, we will discuss the many features that come with Azure SQL Database. We will cover restore services, dynamic data masking, always encrypted, row level security, transparent data encryption, elastic pools, query store, and index advisor. While Azure SQL Database can do a lot of new cool things, there are many aspects of on-premises SQL Server that we are used to that are not included in Azure SQL Database. We will discuss how clients are dealing with their situations, as well as other Azure platform solutions that solve those issues. We will examine the various performance tiers and pricing options to include DTUs, EDTUs, and ESUs. Migrating your databases from on-premises is not as simple as a backup and restore operation. We will cover multiple tools for testing your on-premises databases for compatibility with Azure SQL Database, and explore various tools and methodologies for migrating your data and schemas. Last thing we will examine, built-in and third-party tools for monitoring Azure SQL Databases and explore and discuss various tuning options. I hope you'll join me as we explore Azure SQL Database and its many features and capabilities in this course, SQL Server: Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database.

Exploring Unsupported Features
Hi, this is Tim Radney from SQLskills. com, and I am recording this course for Pluralsight. This course is about SQL Server, Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database, and this is the Exploring Unsupported Features module. In this module I am going to cover a number of features that are unsupported or not included with Azure SQL Database that you are likely used to using with on-premises SQL Server. First I am going to discuss SQL Server Agent and how clients have gotten around not having a scheduler like SQL Server Agent available. Next I will discuss Database Mail and how clients have been able to circumvent not having a mail agent built in. Events and notifications are also missing from Azure SQL Database in addition to SQL Server Trace / Profiler. This one was easy for me to understand since profiler has been deprecated for several versions now. Trace Flags are not supported either, this one also very understandable since this would be instance level. Same with sp_configure. Certain SQL Server components or modules that we are used to associating with or installing with SQL Server are not available with Azure SQL Database. There are common HA solutions that we are accustomed to installing or configuring are not available as well.

Understanding Azure SQL Database Pricing
Hi, this is Tim Radney from SQLskills. com and I am recording this course for Pluralsight. This course is about SQL Server, Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database, and this is the Understanding Azure SQL Database Pricing module. In this module I am going to cover a number of pricing classifications with Azure SQL Database that you are likely to encounter. First I am going to discuss the pricing options for the more common DTU, Database Transaction Unit. DTU is the unit of measure for memory, cpu, and disk IO for a single Azure SQL Database. Next I will discuss the pricing options for eDTUs. This is the Elastic Database Transaction Unit which is used when you chose to have a pool of DTUs to use for a number of databases. Another pricing option is DSUs. These are for Database Stretch Units which are used for stretch tables. Stretch tables are new in SQL Server 2016, and the stretch data is stored in an Azure SQL Database. For compute requirements, you have to choose the DSUs required for the stretched data. Next I am going to discuss DTUs and a good method for figuring out a starting point for your existing workload with what DTU and eDTU size you will need. I will cover this by explaining and demonstrating the DTU calculator. Lastly, I will go over various support options for Azure. While some basic support is free, there are several paid levels depending on what you need for your service level agreements.

Migrating Data to Azure SQL Database
Hi, this is Tim Radney from SQLskills. com, and I am recording this course for Pluralsight. This course is about SQL Server, Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database, and this is the Migrating Data to Azure SQL Database module. In this module I am going to cover a solid approach for considering and migrating on-premises databases to Azure SQL Database. First, I am going to cover various methods for testing for compatibility. Next, I am going to discuss various tools and methods for correcting any compatibility issues that may have been detected. Last, I will be covering multiple ways to migrate your database schemas and data to Azure SQL Database. There are several tools that can be used to check the compatibility of a database for Azure SQL Database migrations. For developers, it is very convenient to check using SQL Server Data Tools. You can use the built-in command line tool that comes with SQL Server Data Tools and SQL Management Studio, called SqlPackage, or one of the simplest methods is using SQL Server Management Studio using the export data tier application. There is also the Data Migration Assistant, and the final tool I will cover is the SQL Azure Migration Wizard.

Monitoring and Tuning Azure SQL Database
Hi, this is Tim Radney from SQLskills. com, and I am recording this course for Pluralsight. This course is about SQL Server, Understanding and Using Azure SQL Database, and this is the Monitoring and Tuning Azure SQL Database module. In this module I am going to cover various ways you can monitor your Azure SQL Databases using built in and external tools, as well as approaches for tuning. First I will cover a number of the built-in tools and dashboards that are available to you within the Azure Portal, as well as a third-party tool that you may find useful. Next, I will cover tuning methods and differences that exist between on-premises and Azure SQL Database. There are several ways to monitor Azure SQL Databases. The Azure Portal is your first line of defense. This is your primary window into your overall Azure account where you can provision new databases, virtual machines, networking, users, and more. There are several dashboards available that provide useful insights into performance, as well as an alerts panel that allows you to configure alert notifications depending on certain conditions. Just like with any SQL Server database, dynamic management views can be used to monitor your Azure SQL Databases. There are several DMVs that are specific to Azure SQL DB that you will need to familiarize yourself with. There is also a third party tool that integrates into Azure SQL Database that can provide additional monitoring and benchmarking for your environment.