Taking The Leap from Flash to HTML5 Video

In this course, I’ll show you how to achieve the same basic video-related tasks in Flash and in HTML5. Through simple side-by-side examples, you’ll be able to compare the technologies and see the strengths and weaknesses of each, and hopefully remove a few bumps from your transition path.
Course info
Rating
(50)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 22, 2013
Duration
2h 48m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(50)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 22, 2013
Duration
2h 48m
Description

Adobe Flash technology has long been the de facto solution for delivering video on the web. From a programming standpoint, it just worked. With ever-growing fragmentation, shifting standards, and lack of Flash support on mobile devices, the industry is currently in flux. HTML5 has emerged as an open source alternative to Flash for video playback, with a growing feature set, support across mobile, and an energized developer community surrounding it. HTML5 is really still in its infancy (well, perhaps adolescence) and its features are still not on par with Flash. But that doesn’t mean it’s not a good way to play video online. In this course, I’ll show you how to achieve the same basic video-related tasks in Flash and in HTML5. Through simple side-by-side examples, you’ll be able to compare the technologies and see the strengths and weaknesses of each, and hopefully remove a few bumps from your transition path.

About the author
About the author

Lisa is a consultant, teacher, and speaker with a passion for empowering people with knowledge, and supporting them in making their goals and aspirations a reality. Whether it's a technology startup, a major corporation, or an entrepreneur with a dream, she lights up the path to success.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

What You'll Want to do in HTML5
In this module, I'm going to go over the current state of HTML5 functionality out in the wild. I'll discuss adaptive streaming, where it works, and where it doesn't, and why. I'll give you your options for live streaming and their limitations. We'll take a look at what's possible for Webcam recording, real-time communication without plugins or servers, and we'll talk a little bit about video caching and content protection and where that's going. Now before we dive in, I'm going to give you one big caveat to this module. The state of HTML5 I may lay out for you here, may pretty quickly become out-of-date. Things are changing fast with HTML5 and open-source technologies in general. So if you find that something I said isn't possible in HTML5, now is, please don't hesitate to drop me a line and give me a nudge to update. I do plan to update the course when there are major changes, but be sure to keep an eye on my blog, LearnFromLisa. com and follow lisamarienyc on Twitter to get the very latest online video news.

Bye For Now
Well, we've covered a lot of ground in this course. We dove into both ActionScript and JavaScript HTML5, and you got to see how the two delivery methods handle video and where they fall short. Hopefully, by comparing the two side by side, you got a clearer picture of which would be the best solution for your particular needs, and also a deeper understanding of both technologies. It should be pretty clear, especially from the last module, that Flash is still alive and kicking for video, but HTML5 is gaining ground fast. And now, after following along in this course, you're well-equipped to move forward with confidence in online video delivery. My goal, as always, is to make the complex simple. I hope I've made online video a little bit simpler for you. Thanks for spending a few hours with me. See you again soon.