Test-Driven Development Practices in Java

This course covers Test-Driven Development (TDD) practices, and tools supporting TDD on the Java Platform.
Course info
Rating
(343)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 7, 2014
Duration
2h 54m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(343)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 7, 2014
Duration
2h 54m
Description

This course covers Test-Driven Development (TDD) practices and tools supporting TDD on the Java Platform. This includes information on JUnit, Mockito, PowerMock, and DBUnit.

About the author
About the author

Mike is a solution architect for US Foods, having worked in technology for over 15 years holding roles focused on technical leadership, solution architecture, and enterprise architecture.

More from the author
Java SE: XML Processing Fundamentals
Intermediate
4h 14m
Oct 25, 2017
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Overview of Practices, Principles, and Tools
Hello. This is Mike Nolan, and welcome to this Pluralsight course Test-Driven Development Practices in Java with Mockito, DBUnit, and PowerMockito. Test-driven development has become a widely accepted and standard practice in modern software development. This approach is commonly referred to as TDD, and will be referenced as such throughout this course. This course has two primary goals. The first goal is to teach some core practices, principles, and patterns to achieve success when taking a test-driven approach to development. The second goal is to provide information related to common Java frameworks used to help simplify your test-driven development practices and support the principles and patterns that will help you achieve success. We will start with an introduction to TDD and provide a quick overview of frameworks covered in this course. We will then focus on usage of the Mockito framework starting with a module covering basic features and then a second module, which takes a deep dive into the more advanced features of the framework. Then we will focus on the DBUnit framework to help support testing of SQL-based data access components. Finally, we will explore another framework named PowerMockito, which provides some capabilities beyond those found in Mockito to further support your automated testing.

Required Setup
Hello. This is Mike Nolan, and welcome to this module of the Test-Driven Development in Java course, which covers setting up your environment for the remaining modules of this course. In this module, we will cover the technologies and installation instructions for getting everything set up. Throughout this course, we will use Java Standard Edition 7 and Eclipse Kepler for our core development. We will rely on Maven to handle download of our framework dependencies. You won't need much background in Maven to get the demos functioning. You will simply need to have the proper software installed so the required libraries can be downloaded. The only assumption I am making in this setup section is that you already know how to install the JDK. Please ensure you are using the latest release of JDK 7. Next, you want to download Kepler. First you'll need to open a web browser and go to the eclipse. org website. Once there, click on the Downloads tab. Once that tab has come up, you'll want to select the version that's appropriate for your operating system. I'm using Windows 7, 64 bit. Then you will select a mirror site to actually download from and wait for the download to complete.

JUnit Overview and Demonstrating Red / Green / Refactor
Hello. This is Mike Nolan, and welcome to this Pluralsight module JUnit Overview and Demonstrating Red/Green/Refactor. To get started with test-driven development in Java, I planned to first go through a basic usage of JUnit covering its core concepts. This will cover standard elements of an automated unit test and an introduction to the core features of JUnit. This will set the foundation for the second half of this module, a detailed demonstration of the Red/Green/Refactor approach.

Basic Features of Mockito
Hello. This is Mike Nolan, and welcome to this Pluralsight module Basic Features of Mockito. This module will focus on the basic everyday uses of the Mockito framework. We will first go through some general concepts around mocking frameworks, how they are used, and how they are intended to help you build unit tests in a manner that isolates the code being tested. I will then go through the everyday features of Mockito and a demonstration and then wrap up providing some more details around these core features.

Mockito Feature Deep-Dive
Hello. This is Mike Nolan, and welcome to this Pluralsight module, Mockito Feature Deep-Dive. In this module we will cover various features in Mockito that I consider to fall outside of everyday usage or require a more detailed explanation that would've obscured the discussion of the basic everyday features. As part of this explanation, we will cover the PowerMock framework, which is an extension of Mockito offering some handy features that you don't need on an everyday basis.

Fixture Management & Data Component Testing
Hello. This is Mike Nolan, and welcome to this Pluralsight module Fixture Management and Data Component Testing. In this module we will go through fixture management concepts exploring techniques for keeping data setup manageable without making your test code too obscure and unmaintainable. We will then go into specific challenges in data setup and management when working with databases and data stores. During this segment we will explore isolation of database testing to your development workstation. Then this module will wrap up with an exploration of the DBUnit library, which helps facilitate data setup and management when testing components that interact with a relational database.