Description
Course info
Rating
(19)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 6, 2015
Duration
3h 52m
Description

In this Unity tutorial, we'll learn how to prepare and make an animated 2D character using a bone hierarchy. We'll pay particular attention to issues such as scaling with respect to 2D physics, inverse kinematics in 2D, Z-orders and Unity's Animator component. We'll also write and assign character control scripts within Unity. By the end of this Unity training, you'll have learned animation techniques that you can start incorporating into your own game projects. Software required: Unity 5, Spriter, Photoshop CC 2015.

About the author
About the author

Shane Whelan is a Game Design tutor at Ballyfermot College in Dublin, currently teaching in the Game Design and Animation degree program.

More from the author
FBX Workflows for Blender to Unity
Beginner
3h 8m
Nov 1, 2019
Rigging a 2D Character in Unity Using IK
Intermediate
1h 57m
Nov 29, 2018
More courses by Shane Whelan
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Shane Whelan. I'm a tutor at Ballyfermot College in Dublin. Where I work with animation and game design students on a Bachelors degree program. In this course we are going to bring a 2D character through a work flow from photoshop through Spriter and in to Unity. Because this course is focused on Unity, I will be showing examples of how some, but not all, of the assets we use are made. This is to avoid repetition. Some of the key take aways from watching this course include learning how to design 2D game content in layers, how to rig and animate a character in Sprite or using reference material made into Sprites, to organize Sprites and Unity using layers sorting and colliders, and to prepare a character animation system for interactive control by using a minimum of C# code. By the end of the training, you will be able to control a 2D character in Unity using a short C# script getting the Unitys animator system to handle most of the work. I'm excited to share these techniques with you, so let's get started with the first lesson.