A Practical Start with TypeScript

This course uses a demo-first approach to get you familiar with TypeScript. You will cover all of the main language features of TypeScript by building software for a vending machine serving drinks and candy.
Course info
Rating
(253)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 18, 2016
Duration
1h 39m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(253)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 18, 2016
Duration
1h 39m
Description

This compact course will introduce you to TypeScript using a practical, demo-first approach. In this course, A Practical Start with TypeScript, you will cover all of the main language features in TypeScript, enabling you to write structured browser code for your app. First, you'll go over the foundations and basics of the TypeScript language, getting you prepared to write it. Next, you will see how to use inheritance, polymorphism, and interfaces in TypeScript. Finally, you will get an explanation of several options to further structure your code, especially with bigger projects. By the end of this course, you'll have the knowledge to feel ready to write your own TypeScript app.

About the author
About the author

Roland is a Microsoft MVP enjoying a constant curiosity around new techniques in software development. His focus is on all things .Net and browser technologies.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Roland Guijt, and welcome to my course, A Practical Start with TypeScript. I'm an independent software developer and trainer based in the Netherlands. Writing browser code or Node. js code in TypeScript gives you many advantages compared to writing JavaScript. It saves you from error-prone code, and because type checking is done as you code, it'll save you lots of time because errors will become apparent before you run your app. You'll learn everything to get started with this powerful language in this course. I'm going to cover everything you need to know by writing a vending machine simulation. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include setting up a programming environment, language features, applying object orientation, and code structuring. By the end of this course, you'll be ready to write a TypeScript app from scratch. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the basics of programming. JavaScript knowledge is handy, but not really needed. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn this great alternative to JavaScript at Pluralsight.

Understanding the Language Basics
This module is about getting to know the TypeScript language basics. After watching this module, you will have a good understanding of the TypeScript syntax, and you can apply built-in, as well as create custom types. At the end of the module, we will have a working vending machine that is able to accept quarters, and it can get you a can of soda.

Applying Object Orientation
In this module I'm covering some more principles of object orientation. At the end of the module you will see a vending machine operating with more coin types, product categories, and products. First, I'll explain what problem polymorphism solves, so you can recognize it in action. We look at class inheritance, which enable base classes, which can be abstract. And lastly, you'll learn about applying interface types. We will apply all these concepts to the vending machine app. Let's continue to work on our coins in the next clip.

Structuring Code
You're watching the fourth module of the Getting Started with TypeScript course. Here's what I'm going to talk about; the global namespace isn't really a feature of TypeScript, but it's important to understand how it works. You'll see how to group your code when an application gets larger with namespaces and modules. The TypeScript language feature called Generics can save you many lines of code. And finally, something that's experimental in TypeScript for now, but important to understand if you're going to work with TypeScript in combination with Angular 2: Decorators. The global namespace is up next.