Getting Started With Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a free operating system which you can run on your PC or laptop instead of Windows or OSX. It's fast, safe, easy to use, hugely powerful, and fun. This course starts with the basics: installing Ubuntu, finding your way around, and using more free software to work and play. Then we move on to more advanced topics like using the command line, building software, and using Ubuntu Server locally and in the Cloud.
Course info
Rating
(345)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 26, 2015
Duration
3h 36m
Table of contents
Introducing Ubuntu
Living With Ubuntu
Working With Ubuntu
Mastering the Command Line
Developing With Ubuntu
Ubuntu Server and the Cloud
Course Summary
Description
Course info
Rating
(345)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 26, 2015
Duration
3h 36m
Description

The tech world is becoming increasingly cross-platform. Some of the best new tools and techniques are grown on the Linux platform and may never migrate to OSX or Windows. Ubuntu is a free distribution of the Linux operating system which is fast, easy to use, and hugely powerful. Ubuntu is solid, secure, well-supported, and fun. This course starts with the basics: installing Ubuntu, finding your way around, and using more free software to work and play in Ubuntu. Then we move on to more advanced topics like using the command line, building software, and using Ubuntu Server locally and in the Cloud. By the end of the course you'll be comfortable with Ubuntu and Linux, and a world of new tools will be open.

About the author
About the author

Elton is an independent consultant specializing in systems integration with the Microsoft stack. He is a Microsoft MVP, blogger, and practicing Technical Architect.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Living With Ubuntu
Hi there, I'm Elton, and welcome to Living with Ubuntu, the next module in Getting Started with Ubuntu. In this module, we'll look at how Ubuntu fits in with your everyday life with a computer, using the internet, communicating, playing music, and managing your photos. Ubuntu comes installed with dozens of apps, so when you've finished your installation, you can start using it straight away without having to find, download, and install any more software. That software is all free and open source too, and if you want something that the standard install doesn't give you, like a CD ripper or an improved video player, then you can easily find and install new packages from the Ubuntu Software Center. The Software Center is like the Apple App store, and Google Play It's a place for apps to be showcased, reviewed, and purchased, although with Ubuntu most of the apps are free. We'll see it in action soon, but let's start with the pre-installed software and look at web browsing with Ubuntu.

Working With Ubuntu
Hi there. My name's Elton, and welcome to Working with Ubuntu, the next module in Getting Started with Ubuntu. We're going to look at the Office suite that comes with Ubuntu desktop, have a walk around all the main packages and see what you can do with them, and how they work with documents from Microsoft Office suite. When you install Ubuntu desktop, you'll get the latest version of the LibreOffice suite, which is a fully featured Office suite for Linux distributions and is the default suite for GNOME based distros like Ubuntu. LibreOffice has five main packages, but only four of them are in the default installation. There's Writer for creating text documents, Impress for presentations, Calc for spreadsheets, and Draw for pictures. We'll focus on the first three of those in this module, but LibreOffice also comes with a database program, Base, and an equation editor, Math. The packages all work well together, so you can create a chart in Calc, include it in Writer and Impress documents, and when you change the data in one program it updates in the other documents. There's also a scripting language for repetitive tasks and LibreOffice shares a lot of functionality between the packages, so it's an easy suite to pick up. I don't hope to cover all the functionality of all the packages in this module, but what I will do is show you the main features you tend to use when you work with Office programs, some nice touches that give LibreOffice the edge over other packages, and how far you can go to use LibreOffice to work with Microsoft Office documents.