Understanding the Difference Between Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS

Choosing a public cloud provider is a big decision. This course will teach you how the Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services (AWS) clouds are similar and different.
Course info
Rating
(38)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 3, 2017
Duration
6h 16m
Table of contents
Course Overview
The Fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context
The PaaS Scenario
The IaaS Scenario
The Hybrid Cloud/Identity Scenario
The SaaS Integration Scenario
The Cloud Storage Scenario
The Database Scenario
The Security Scenario
The Availability/Disaster Recovery Scenario
The Decision Point
Description
Course info
Rating
(38)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 3, 2017
Duration
6h 16m
Description

Which public cloud service provider is best for your business? Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure are the market leaders, but what differentiates one vendor from another? In this comprehensive course, Understanding the Difference Between Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS, you'll walk away being able to: discuss intelligently the similarities and differences between Azure and AWS, determine which cloud (or clouds) is/are best for your company's requirements, and save your company money by provisioning only those cloud services you actually need. The goal of this course is to help you surmount your initial learning curve with AWS/Azure terminology, place their services in context, and equip you with confidence to make an effective purchase decision. By the end this course, you'll have a clear picture as to how Azure and AWS are both similar to and different from one another. You'll be comfortable with all the requisite lingo and be able to participate meaningfully in cloud architecture discussions.

About the author
About the author

Timothy Warner is a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) in Cloud and Datacenter Management who is based in Nashville, TN.

More from the author
More courses by Tim Warner
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello and welcome to our course, Understand the Difference Between Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services. My name is Tim Warner, and I'm a full-time trainer and technology evangelist with Pluralsight. I'm also your instructor for this course. We designed this course to answer the question, Which public cloud vendor, Microsoft or Amazon, is best for your business? Of course, that's a loaded question, and you may decide that both or neither vendor is a good fit. Nevertheless, our goal is to help you overcome your learning curve with Azure and AWS terminology and to equip you with the wide spectrum knowledge you need to make an effective implementation decision. Some of the major topics we'll cover include putting the public cloud in context, comparing Azure and AWS in several important use cases, Platform as a Service, Infrastructure as a Service, Software as a Service, hybrid cloud and identity, storage, database, security, and availability disaster recovery. By the end of this course, you'll have a clear picture as to how Azure and AWS are both similar to and different from one another. You'll be comfortable with all the requisite lingo and be able to participate meaningfully in cloud architecture discussions. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with your company's business and technical requirements and have a clear picture of the pain points that led you to consider the public cloud in the first place. To follow along with my demos, you'll need an internet connected PC or Mac, as well as a free trial subscription to Azure and AWS. Don't worry. I walk you through those procedures in the training. From here, you should feel more confident with the Azure and AWS public clouds. You should also be ready to proceed into deeper training on each platform in the Pluralsight library. There's plenty of quality content available. I hope you'll join me on this journey of cloud discovery in our Understand the Difference Between Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS course from Pluralsight.

The Fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context
Hello there and welcome to Pluralsight. And welcome to the course entitled, Understand the difference Between Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS. This first module is entitled, The Fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context. My name is Tim Warner, and I'm happy and grateful to be your instructor. This course consists of ten related modules, the first of which we're doing today, The Fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context, after which we'll get into various scenarios. First, the PaaS scenario, then the IaaS scenario, then the hybrid cloud and identity scenario, SaaS integration, cloud storage, database, security, availability/disaster recovery, and then, ultimately, the decision point. If you're thinking, Hold on a second, Tim, hold on. What are all of these acronyms? PaaS, IaaS, SaaS? By the end of this module, you will understand all of those terms I assure you. I have just three learning objectives for you in this module. I want you to walk away feeling well placed in this course. We'll go over the audiences, and that is plural, audiences, that I'm targeting this training toward. We're going to cover cloud computing--the basics, the fundamentals, the quick start. Whatever you want to call it, there's lots and lots of conflicting terminology online. I want to make sure that we're all straightened out with that. And we're also going to take a brief look at the competitive landscape. Of course, ultimately we're collapsing our concern on two cloud service providers--Amazon with their Amazon Web Services AWS portfolio and Microsoft with their Azure one.

The PaaS Scenario
Hello there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and this module is entitled, The PaaS Scenario. What we're doing in this course is performing an in-depth comparison and contrast between two of the leading public cloud providers, Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS. The first module was called, The fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context. It was meant to give us a good running start. Now, though, in module 2, The PaaS Scenario, we're actually going to begin diving in to each platform at depth. After we cover Platform as a Service here, we'll then investigate Infrastructure as a Service, the hybrid cloud identity scenario, the SaaS integration scenario, the cloud storage scenario, the database scenario, the security scenario, the availability and disaster recovery scenario, and then, finally, we'll wrap up with the decision point. Yes, you see the word 'scenario' there a lot. This is definitely a scenario-based course. I have three learning objectives for us today. First of all, I want us to compare the free service tiers between AWS and Azure. After which, we will actually demo or I will demo signing up for Azure and AWS so you can see exactly what's involved. And then we will look at PaaS specifically, how hosted web apps work in each platform. Let's get started.

The IaaS Scenario
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and this module is entitled The IaaS Scenario. We're working our way through a comprehensive comparison between the two major public cloud providers, namely Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services, AWS. The first module was called Putting Clouds in Context. Then we began looking at the various services one at a time, pro and con for each provider. First, we did Platform as a Service. Today, we're doing Infrastructure as a Service, and then we're going to go through a number of other scenarios, hybrid cloud and identity, SaaS integration, cloud storage, database, security, availability and disaster recovery, ultimately reaching a decision point. I have four learning objectives for you in this module. First, we're going to understand the Infrastructure as a Service use case before we get into Azure and AWS specifics. I want to make sure that you walk away from this module with a good understanding of both what Microsoft and Amazon are offering with regard to virtual machines in the cloud. I want you to understand a bit about their deployment architectures, and I'll conduct demonstrations, in which I show you the workflow for deploying cloud VMs from each provider. Let's get started.

The Hybrid Cloud/Identity Scenario
Hello there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner. And you're watching the module entitled, The Hybrid Cloud/Identity Scenario. My goal is to walk you through the Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services public clouds so that you can be well equipped to make a choice. And for that matter, you may decide that using both clouds at the same time may suit your business needs the best. Anyway, I have ten modules for you. The first was called, The Fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context. Then and for the rest of this course actually, we look at various scenarios. We start with Platform as a Service. Then we moved to virtual machines in the cloud, IaaS. Today, we're covering the hybrid cloud and identity scenario. Then we'll look at Software as a Service, cloud storage, database, security, availability and disaster recovery, and, ultimately, we'll spend time at the end wrapping things up. I have four main tasks/learning objectives for us in this module. First, I want to do a little remedial work and make sure that you understand the difference between the managed and the unmanaged clouds. Then we'll get right into it. I'm going to begin actually with the identity piece. I need you to understand how identity is manifested in Azure and AWS. And then we'll look at the hybrid cloud. Now the reason why I took identity and hybrid cloud and put them in the same module rather than splitting them is because they're very much linked and intertwined. You'll see that I'm sure as we go along. I'm going to do demos along the way that allow you to compare and contrast the hybrid cloud offerings between Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS. Let's get into it.

The SaaS Integration Scenario
Hi there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and you're watching the module entitled, The SaaS Integration Scenario. We're working our way through a ten-module series on understanding the differences between Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services. The first of those ten modules is a global introduction that I called The Fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context. We then take a scenario approach starting with Platform as a Service, Infrastructure as a Service, hybrid cloud. Today, we're doing SaaS, the third primary cloud service delivery model. Then we do cloud storage, database, security, availability and disaster recovery, and, finally, the decision point. I have just two learning objectives for you this time around. We're going to take a moment to define a couple of relevant vocabulary terms and understand the goals behind single sign-on and SaaS app integration in both Azure and AWS. We're then going to do as we always do a service comparison weighing the strengths and weaknesses of each public cloud provider. Let's begin.

The Cloud Storage Scenario
Hello there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and this module is called, The Cloud Storage Scenario. As you know, we're working our way through a comparison/survey of Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services. The first of the ten modules sets the stage or puts the cloud services in some kind of context. And then we get into feature by feature, scenario by scenario how these services are similar and different. We do PaaS, Platform as a Service, Infrastructure as a Service, hybrid cloud and identity, SaaS, Software as a Service integration. Today, we're covering cloud storage. Next, there's database (that's certainly related to storage), the security scenario, availability and disaster recovery, and, finally, the decision point. I have three learning objectives for you, what I want you to learn. First of all, we're going to cover briefly relevant vocab words and just we're going to pay some attention and some appreciation to how crucial cloud storage is not only to businesses but to individuals, now more than ever before. And we're going to examine the Microsoft Azure storage story and products, as well as Amazon Web Services. And as usual, I'll give you the facts and figures. I'll do some practical demo work, and it's up to you to decide which or both or neither of these cloud providers suits your needs. Let's get started.

The Database Scenario
Hey there, what's up? Welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and this module is entitled, The Database Scenario. The first module in our Understand Azure and AWS course is The Fundamentals: Putting Clouds in Context. And then I decided to take a scenario by scenario approach in comparing Amazon Web Services with Microsoft Azure. We look at Platform as a Service, Infrastructure as a Service, hybrid cloud and identity, Software as a Service, cloud storage. Today we're covering databases, then we do security, availability/disaster recovery, and wrap up. Ten related modules in total. I have four learning objectives for us today. We're going to begin with the case for Database as a Service, just reviewing the use case from a high level. Then we'll look at offerings from Azure and AWS in the relational database market, as well as the non-relational database market. We'll wrap up with a consideration of big data in data warehouses. Let's get started. We have a lot to cover.

The Security Scenario
Hi there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and this module is entitled, The Security Scenario. Today's lesson is just one of several different scenarios I've drawn between the two leading public cloud vendors--Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services. Of the ten courses, the beginning one, Putting Clouds in Context, sets the stage and expectations for the rest of this training. We begin our scenario approach looking at Platform as a Service, then moving through IaaS, hybrid cloud and identity, Software as a Service, cloud storage, databases. Today, we're covering security. The last content module is availability and disaster recovery. And then we wrap everything up. My goal is to give you an excellent baseline understanding of both Azure and AWS so that you can make a decision for your company which, neither, or both you need for your business. I have three learning objectives for you in this module. We're going to begin at looking at the datacenter presence of Azure and AWS. To let the cat out of the bag preliminarily, it's a very even playing field. There was a time for many years, because AWS had quite a head start on Microsoft, that nobody could come close to the AWS datacenter scale. But that situation has certainly changed. We're going to look at security compliance. This is on the minds of many systems administrators, system architects, developers, security professionals. And once again, we're going to see a lot of parity between AWS and Azure. We're going to finish by reviewing or I'll at least get you started along the road of what to look for, what to look at, and how to get help in terms of ensuring compliance and maximizing your cloud security. Tools and helpers specifically. Let's begin.

The Availability/Disaster Recovery Scenario
Hello there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner, and this module is entitled, The Availability/Disaster Recovery Scenario. We're almost finished with our survey of Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services. This is a ten-module course, the first of which puts clouds in context in general terms. We then compare Azure and AWS along different axes. We look at scenarios like Platform as a Service, Infrastructure as a Service, hybrid cloud, Software as a Service, cloud storage, database, security. Today, we're doing availability and disaster recovery, and that actually wraps up the content. The final tenth module, The Decision Point, is a roundup. I have three touch points along the way for us in our learning journey. First, we have, well disaster recovery touchpoints, which is not a full mini-course on disaster recovery, but I just want to make sure you know some of the most popular buzzwords so that we're on the same conceptual page. We'll then simply like we've been doing go through AWS and Azure, their landscape for disaster recovery, and this can help you see points of similarity and difference. Let's begin.