Visual Studio Team Services: Migrating from TFS

At first glance, migrating to Visual Studio Team Services seems like a daunting task. This course walks through all required migration steps in detail and gives substantial best practices, resources, and cleanup recommendations along the way.
Course info
Rating
(14)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 20, 2017
Duration
3h 53m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Improving Your Life with VSTS
Setting up VSTS, Azure AD Integration, and Creating Users
Using Team Projects and Security Taxonomies Effectively
Migrating Work Item Data
Migrating Test Plans
Migrating Builds
Migrating to Git Source Control
Understanding Differences with Test Execution
Using Advanced Migration Tools
Conclusion - Keeping Current
Description
Course info
Rating
(14)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 20, 2017
Duration
3h 53m
Description

Team Foundation Server is getting better than it has ever been. The cloud offering of TFS, Visual Studio Team Services, is now mature enough that just about any organization out there can take advantage of the many benefits of the cloud infrastructure. It is apparent that a great majority of TFS users have already migrated to VSTS. Unfortunately, the end-to-end walkthrough resources out there tend to fall flat in this area. In this course, Visual Studio Team Services: Migrating from TFS, you will learn the many facets of every migration step, as well as the pitfalls that can be realized by non-optimal decisions. You'll also explore migrating to GIT source control. Finally, you'll learn and understanding the important responsibilities about being a user of cloud technologies. This course can be used as a guide for specific parts of a migration or the entire system. After finishing this course, you will have the skills needed to perform a best-practice migration to VSTS from any level of TFS on-premises implementation.

About the author
About the author

Scott has over 20 years of experience with software development, ALM consulting, and cloud computing.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Scott Tate and welcome to my course Visual Studio Team Services: Migrating from TFS. Among other things, I'm a cloud engineer of AJER, AWS, and ALM technologies in general at blindspot. com and I've been helping companies achieve their goals with cloud technologies for the better part of a decade. There are three types of people in this world: those that are in the cloud, those that want to be in the cloud, and those that are thinking about migrating to the cloud. Now, while that statement is a bit facetious and absolute, it's still not that far from the truth. Visual Studio Team Services and TFS are no exceptions to that dogma. End users are constantly amazed at how much migrating to a cloud based VSTS implementation has a positive impact on their resourcing, efficiency, and overall bottom line. In this course, we're going to take a methodical path through migrating an on premises TFS implementation to a Visual Studio Team Services destination. Although cleaning out the proverbial garage in the process, in this fast paced world very seldom do we get opportunities to improve upon critical tools in our lives. Besides taking you through the migration process, this course will give you a veritable cornucopia of best practices to improve during the migration process. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include: setting up the Target Team Project for maximum efficiency, security, and convenience, migrating Work item and test data all while organizing it a bit in the process, migrating to GIT source control and understanding the important responsibilities about being a user of cloud technologies. By the end of this course, you'll have a full understanding of migration tasks and requirements or better yet, you will have performed a full migration to Visual Studio Team Services. Before beginning this course you should be familiar with Team Foundation Server and Visual Studio Team Services as this course isn't intended to teach you the technologies themselves. I hope you'll join me in this journey to learn the migration best practices with Visual Studio Team Services: Migrating from TFS at Pluralsight.

Using Team Projects and Security Taxonomies Effectively
Hey everyone, welcome to module three. You survived the AD integration steps in module two, so I wanted to assure you that things get substantially simpler from here. In this module I'm going to talk to you about how and when to use teams and team projects and then I'll go over and teach you a few very basic rules around setting up a simple, yet lasting, security taxonomy in your implementation. If I give us a quick progress check against our overall outline, we now have a VSTS account set up and integrated with our on-premises active directory. Let's now build on that active directory integration by adding users into various teams. Before I do that we're going to go over a highly undocumented choice you'll need to make around creating teams versus team projects. One of the most undocumented choices you'll have to make surrounds the choice of using team sites or collections, team projects or teams as part of your implementation. I'll take a few minutes and clear the air on pros and cons of each decision type. Among the large mistakes I see in the administration of TFS in general: security management. I would venture to say that 75% or more of all implementations start out and maintain no concrete security rules, user permissions, or organized security taxonomies and hence quickly take on a chaotic path. At that point that creates difficulties in managing users and permissions.

Understanding Differences with Test Execution
While not specific to the migration discussion, it is important to understand that test execution VSTS is not intended to work in exactly the same way with pre-2015 TSF versions. I'll take you through a short discussion and demo so you too can understand this concept before you migrate. So far so good. Congratulations on making it this far. Let's see if this wizard can help us quickly demystify the differences in test execution in VSTS to put you in a better place after the migration. At the moment, we're still not all the way through a transitionary period for Microsoft with TFS test tools. During this transition, it's important that you understand the direction that Microsoft is taking and what it means for the potential plethora of your test assets you may have in your ALM ecosystem. As it stands, I don't have a ton of articles out there for you to better understand the available VSTS test tools. However, there is one great blog post from Microsoft that consolidates 50 or more articles, videos, and blog posts about nearly every subject. Now, admittedly, some of them are more than a year old at this point. However, the VSTS testing platform is changing so rapidly that keeping updated can be somewhat difficult. If you get a chance, peek through the compendium of articles and videos on this link. The second article is a link to a blog post by Ben Day, another great Pluralsight author with many courses in the catalog. In this article, Ben talks about the end of the road for Microsoft Test Manager. If you're still using MTM, you'll want to read through this article.

Using Advanced Migration Tools
At this point in the course, I don't have anything more to teach you about migrating bits and pieces of a TFS implementation. By now, you should be able to migrate work-item data all the way to test assets. To that end, we're not going to focus on the big bang tools for migrating to Visual Studio Team Services. In this module, I'll go through the process of performing an OpsHub Migration for you. Now we're in the home stretch. Let's take a little time and run through a migration with one of the all-encompassing migration tools out there. You should be well versed in all areas of migrating individual parts of a team foundation server implementation to VSTS. I consider this to be the fundamentals in the migration discussion. Now that you know the fundamentals, and have the ability to migrate any one area of TFS, let's take a look at one popular tool that migrates everything for you. The first link takes you directly to the OpsHub homepage. In my demo, I'm going to perform a team project migration with the free version of OpsHub. OpsHub premium is a commercial tool, from which you can get a heavy amount of support and assistance with complex migrations. The second link is the Visual Studio Marketplace link to download the Migration Utility.

Conclusion - Keeping Current
In this last module, I did want to teach you about a newly required responsibility if you're new to cloud tools. We love cloud tools as they often move even more quickly than we want them to. While that is a major benefit, it can also be a bit of a bug that can bite you when you least expect it. Cloud systems change rapidly and you want to cloud-proof yourself against any surprises. In this module, I'll teach you that responsibility. We've made it to the end. By now, you have all the tools in your chest that you need to migrate any level of enterprise to the VSTS cloud. Before we depart, let me urge upon why you cannot yet just sit back and eat your proverbial popcorn without any viable caution. Wait, we're in the cloud now, so we have nothing to worry about, right? We can reduce our IT support staff and let Microsoft deal with all the worry over upgrades, reliability and versioning, right? I wish that were true, but it's not. Sure Microsoft worries about those things, but don't underestimate the support requirements of VSTS and Azure. IT support engineers now have to have a mindset as a cloud engineer. Don't believe me? I'll give you a few examples in a bit that might change your mind. These are three sites you'll absolutely have to add as favorites if you plan on migration to Visual Studio Team Services. The first site is the link to the VSTS team's high level backlog and feature timeline. It tells you when every feature is slated to be delivered in the cloud platform. In short, this page will keep you updated with what's coming. The second link is the ALM Blog which I make a habit of reading every week. It outlines new extensions in the marketplace, new important features and gives great detail therein. Don't miss a new extension or feature that could solve some of your current problems in your workflow. The third article is a higher level view of what's contained in the feature timeline. You can get more detail on the product update page about future features in the system.