Managing Work with Team Foundation Server 2010

This course teaches the concepts of Team Foundation Server 2010 with detail and language suitable for any team member, not just software developers
Course info
Rating
(201)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 20, 2010
Duration
2h 30m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(201)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 20, 2010
Duration
2h 30m
Description

As a complete Application Lifecycle Management solution, Team Foundation Server is no longer used only by developers. Several features of TFS are used by non-technical team members like Project Managers, Business Analysts, Product Owners and departmental managers. This course teaches concepts and usage of TFS 2010 with detail and language suitable for non-technical team members, and a level of detail appropriate to anyone needing an overview of the platform's capabilities.

About the author
About the author

John Brown is a Software Craftsman continually looking for intuitive designs, agile architectures, and streamlined processes. With degrees in Computer Science from Johns Hopkins and Aerospace Engineering from Purdue, John is always up for a challenge, especially in his areas of interest in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Process Template and Work Items for TFS 2010
Welcome to the Process Template and Work Items module for the Team Foundation Server 2010. My name is John Brown, and in this module we will talk about how to get a project started using Team Foundation Server. In this module, we'll start by talking about the organization of a project in Team Foundation Server by discussing the process templates, the process structure, and the guidance and how to use them. We'll also discuss the core building blocks of TFS, work items, the components of the work items, the rules of how they interact, and how to access them. And finally, we'll discuss how to create queries to pull back the specific work items you are looking for.

Excel Client for TFS 2010
Welcome to the Microsoft Excel Client for Team Foundation Server 2010 module. My name is John Brown. In this module we're going to review how to use Microsoft Excel as a first class client of Team Foundation Server. We'll talk about what's required to connect to the Team Foundation Server, we'll review the input lists and adding new items to Team Foundation Server, we'll also look at the queried lists and pulling back items in various formats from the Team Foundation Server. We'll also briefly look at the report capabilities of Excel in conjunction with TFS.

Manual Testing
Welcome to the Microsoft Test Manager module for manual testing using Team Foundation Server 2010. My name is John Brown, and in this module we'll talk about how non-developers address testing with Team Foundation Server. In this module I'll review with you Microsoft's new testing tool designed to help with functional testing. We'll talk about how Microsoft Test Manager interacts and works with Team Foundation Server as a first class client. We'll see how to use MTM as a planning and organizational agent that provides the structure to testing. We'll of course see how to create an individual test and how to share components between tests. Finally, we'll spend some time running through a few tests to see how we automate some of the repetitive aspects of testing and simplify bug creation.

Built-in Reports for TFS 2010
Hello, and welcome to the Team Foundation Server Built-in Reports module. My name is John Brown, and we'll be reviewing the reports that come built in with the process templates of Team Foundation Server. In this module, we'll take a look at how the TFS reporting architecture allows the various reports to be developed. We'll then take a look at the individual bug reports, build reports, project management reports, and test reports that are available from the agile process template. Team Foundation Server is the central repository of all of the data that Visual Studio and the other TFS clients provide. It stores that data in operational data stores for the online transaction processing. This means that TFS is always reporting the current status of any work item. Every two hours, by default, TFS will transform each database's data using adapters into the data warehouse. This data warehouse provides the aggregate reporting of measures and dimensions of the data. Furthermore, the analysis cube takes snapshots of the data over time to provide the online analytical processing to see the trends of the data. All of the reports are surfaced to the users through the Microsoft Reporting Services and the various clients that can access Reporting Services. To get access to the reports, it is easiest to select the reports from the SharePoint portal, as of course the other way is to use the Team Explorer of Visual Studio. This will have been installed if you are using any of the other clients of TFS that come with the Office suite, such as Project and Excel.