Solution Modeling with UML in Visual Studio 2010

Describes how to use the various UML diagram types included in Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate
Course info
Rating
(186)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 10, 2011
Duration
2h 24m
Table of contents
Building Behavioral UML Models in Visual Studio 2010
Building Structural UML Models in Visual Studio 2010
Managing the UML Model Lifecycle in Visual Studio 2010 - Part I
Managing the UML Model Lifecycle in Visual Studio 2010 - Part II
Choosing the Right UML Model in Visual Studio 2010
Description
Course info
Rating
(186)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 10, 2011
Duration
2h 24m
Description

This course explains the behavioral and structural UML model types and how to build them within Visual Studio 2010.

About the author
About the author

Richard Seroter is the VP of Product Marketing at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also an 11-time Microsoft MVP for cloud, an instructor for Pluralsight, the lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, and author of multiple books. As Vice President at Pivotal, Richard leads product, customer, technical, and partner marketing teams. Richard maintains a regularly updated blog on topics of architecture and solution design and can be found on Twitter as @rseroter.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Building Behavioral UML Models in Visual Studio 2010
Hi. My name is Richard Seroter and welcome to the first module in this course on how you us Visual Studio 2010s new UML modeling capabilities. In this very first module we'll have a quick introduction to UMLs _____ and a few type of model types. The second module in the course we'll look at some additional model types. The third module we'll look at how you actually use these in a lifecycle and how you can reuse and leverage some of the components and the final module in this course will look at why of UML, so really why would you buy certain models and diagrams and types? By the end of this particular module you should be able to be comfortable in Visual Studio's modeling environment, as well as be able to create three different UML diagram types. Over the length of this particular module I will cover what UML is briefly, how UML is supported in Visual Studio 2010, a brief overview of an area that we're going to cover throughout all four modules in this course, and then look at specifically how to build three different diagram types or the core components. Let's jump in.

Building Structural UML Models in Visual Studio 2010
Hi and welcome to this second module on the course on how you build and manage UML models using Visual Studio 2010. In the very first module we looked at how you build the behavioral diagrams in UML, things like use case diagrams, activity diagrams, and sequence diagrams. In this particular module we're going to take a look at a different type of model, the structural models. Specifically, we'll start with taking a quick review of the scenario we've been leveraging since the first training module, then we'll look at the two types of structural models that Visual Studio supports, the component model and the class model. Our summary is a simple web provider for a local pet store. They want to be able to provide ordering of products, they want to be able to let people manage and create service appointments online, so that's the scenario we'll be using throughout the course here. Let's take a look next at the actual component diagrams.

Managing the UML Model Lifecycle in Visual Studio 2010 - Part I
Hi and welcome to the third module in this course on working with UML and Visual Studio 2010. In the previous two modules we looked at the two categories of diagram types, behavioral models, things like use case, activity, and_____ diagrams, and structural models, which cover things like component and class diagrams and describe the architecture of the actual system. In this module we'll look at how you manage those models through topics like reuse and extension and how do we maintain this model throughout its lifecycle? We'll start off by quickly reviewing the scenario we've followed so far in the course, just for some continuity. Next, we'll look at how you interact with the model using the new UML Model Explorer. Then we'll look at how you generate code for models, then the opposite scenario, when you want to actually generate models from code. After that we'll look at how you can extend the UML models Visual Studio 2010, specifically through profiles. Then finally, we'll look at how I can take UML models built-in other tools and import those model elements into Visual Studio for use. As a quick overview, we're working with Watson's Pet Store, a local pet store that has a website for people ordering products to pick up in the store or ordering services for their actual pet.

Choosing the Right UML Model in Visual Studio 2010
Hello and welcome to the fourth and final module in this course on working with UML models in Visual Studio 2010. In the first two modules we looked at how you build models. How do you build both behavioral models, things like use cases and so forth, and how do you build structural models, which describe the actual system? In the third module we looked at how you actually maintain, extend these models by things like reuse and topics such as that. In this module we'll actually discuss when you use a particular model type, so not just how to build them, which we've already covered, but why would you choose a particular one. Let's start off with a really quick summary of why you use UML in general. We'll then cover what, why, who, and when of use case diagrams. What are they, why would I use them, who builds them and who consumes them, and when do I actually create them? We'll cover the same thing with activity diagrams, with sequence diagrams, with component diagrams, and finally with class diagrams, and so with all of these we'll have a better sense of when you apply these models, who gets the most value out of them.