Portfolios, Programs, and Projects: What’s the Difference?

This course unravels the terminology used to describe projects, programs, and portfolios, allowing you to quickly understand the relationships that exist between of each of these artefacts.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 26, 2021
Duration
38m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 26, 2021
Duration
38m
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Description

In today's world, organizations are becoming increasingly focused on packing work into projects. As this becomes more common, there's a requirement to structure these projects into programs, and programs into portfolios. In this course, Portfolios, Programs, and Projects: What’s the Difference?, you'll learn, by way of real world examples, how to identify and classify a project, program, and portfolio. First, you'll learn how these entities all relate to each other. Next, you will discover the relationships and hierarchy that exist between them. Finally, you’ll discover some of the more common tools that are used to help manage them. When you’re finished this course, you’ll have the skills and knowledge to classify, identify, and talk confidently about portfolios, programs, and projects.

Course FAQ
Course FAQ
What is organization management?

Organization management is the skill of getting people together on a common platform or task and making them work towards a common predetermined goal.

What will you learn in this management course?

In this course, you will learn about what projects are, what programs are, what a portfolio is, and you will learn about specific management tools to help you keep organized.

Who is this management course for?

This course is for anyone who wants to improve their organization skills.

Are there any prerequisites for this management course?

There are no prerequisites for this course.

What is project management?

Project management is the process of leading the work of a team to achieve goals and meet specific criteria.

About the author
About the author

Ben is a Power BI & Data Specialist with a healthy interest in Microsoft Project with over 30 years of customer and implementation experience. He has been a Microsoft MVP for 13 years, is a frequent speaker at several European conferences, and blogs and creates videos on a semi-regular basis.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone! My name is Ben Howard, and welcome to this course, which is called Portfolios, Programs, and Projects: What's the Difference? In today's world, organizations are becoming increasingly focused on packaging work into projects, and as this becomes more common, there's the requirement to structure these projects into programs and then programs into portfolios. So, why do we need this structure? Well, it's because at its purest form, a project is really just an investment that is made in order to effect a change within an organization. And so the organization's management team requires standardized terms and methodologies in order to track the investment and to ensure that the investments deliver their promised benefits. Many projects are run simultaneously and provide solutions or products that are part of a larger common theme, and these common themes often contribute to delivering the organization's strategic goals. The terms program and portfolio are used to help group the projects into these common themes and goals in order to provide the clarity and investment tracking that the management team require. You'll learn by way of solid definitions and examples exactly what a project is, what a program is, and what a portfolio is, and how these entities relate to each other. You'll also gain an oversight and insight into some of the most common project and portfolio management tools on the market today. At the end of this course, you'll be fully conversant with definitions and concepts regarding portfolios, programs, and projects, and you'll be able to classify your work within these structures. I hope you'll join me, Ben Howard, in learning more about these subjects in this course with Pluralsight.