Windows Server 2008 Admin with PowerShell Performance Monitoring

Part 3 of 3 in the Windows Server 2008 PowerShell series. This course is aimed at teaching Windows administrators a broad range of management tasks using Windows PowerShell 2.0.
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 8, 2011
Duration
3h 51m
Table of contents
Managing Print Services
Managing the Registry
Performance Measuring and Monitoring
Next Steps
Description
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 8, 2011
Duration
3h 51m
Description

Part 3 of 3 in the Windows Server 2008 PowerShell series. This course is aimed at teaching Windows administrators a broad range of management tasks using Windows PowerShell 2.0. The focus is on general Windows Server 2008 R2 administration. These are topics that apply to all server roles. Emphasis is made on using Microsoft authored cmdlets in an interactive console session. Writing scripts and functions will be introduced to you, including 10 tasks that help every Windows Admin. This course takes a task-oriented approach, that is, how do I accomplish a typical management task using Windows PowerShell?

About the author
About the author

Jeffery Hicks is a Microsoft MVP in Windows PowerShell and an IT veteran with many years of experience, much of it spent as an IT consultant specializing in Microsoft server technologies with an emphasis in automation and efficiency.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Managing Print Services
Hi. This is Jeff Hicks. You're watching the lesson, Managing Print Services and this is the course, Windows Server 2008 PowerShell Training. In this course we're going to look at managing print services with Windows PowerShell. So we'll start off by looking at how we can enumerate the print devices; in other words, what printers do I have on my print server? How are they configured? What do they look like? We'll also look at managing a print device. For example, if I want to make a printer published in Active Directory and if it's not, how do I accomplish that? I'll show you how we can do that with Windows PowerShell. We'll look at adding a print device as well as adding a printer port. You may need to define say a TCIP port and then create a printer on that port. I'll show you how we can do that with Windows PowerShell so you don't always have to use the GUI. We'll also look at removing a printer from your print server. We'll spend a little bit of time looking at the print queue and/or the jobs that go along with that. So I'll show you how to manage or kind of enumerate what's happening on your print server including pausing and resuming a print queue. There may be times where you want to suspend actions so you can take a look at something and then resume it. We'll also look at managing print jobs. You may want to find out how old some jobs are, how many jobs are queued up and so on, as well as deleting or canceling print jobs.

Managing the Registry
Once again, welcome to the TrainSignal course, Windows Server 2008 PowerShell Training. I'm your instructor, Jeff Hicks, and today we're going to look at Managing the registry with Windows PowerShell. In this lesson we're going to go through and explore how we can manage and do things with the registry using Windows PowerShell. We'll look at using the Registry Provider and the PSDrive that we get for each key local machine and each key current user and we'll explore how we can work with these to get information from the registry, to write information to the registry, both locally and remotely. We'll look at how to search the registry. Now there are some limitations here, but I'll show you a few workarounds and how we can solve the issue of trying to find data in this big hodgepodge we call the registry. We'll also look at how to modify the registry. Very often I am asked, how do I create a registry key or update a registry key and I'm always a little amazed how much registry management people still need to do, but it can be done and it's really quite simple with PowerShell and I'll show you how we can accomplish that. And then lastly we'll look at working with transactions in the registry. A transaction is a special process where all of the commands have to complete successfully in order for the change to be effective, otherwise if there's an error anywhere along the way then everything rolls back. So when you're making changes to the registry, using transactions is kind of a smart thing to do.

Performance Measuring and Monitoring
Hello again. This is Jeffery Hicks. You're watching the TrainSignal course, Windows Server 2008 PowerShell Training and this is the lesson on Performance Measuring and Monitoring. In this lesson we're going to look at how to use PowerShell to get performance metrics on our servers in the Chicago office. We're going to look for example at calculating and measuring how long has a server or system been up and running? How long has a process been running, or how long has a particular service been up and running? There are ways we can accomplish this so if you want to build some reports to track these things, I'll show you how we can accomplish that with PowerShell. We'll also look at general performance monitoring. These are things that we can capture via performance counters. One that we can do this is to use WMI; there are some specific classes that will return performance information as well as actual performance counters the same that you would use if you were to use the PerfMon Management Console, but we can do the same thing in PowerShell and what's even nicer is we can import and export so we can grab counter information and save it to a file and then later reimport it if we want to slice and dice it, or we could open up that file in Performance Monitor itself and then add the counters and work with the graphical information that way.

Next Steps
Hello and welcome to the Next Steps lesson. This is part of the Windows Server 2008 PowerShell Training course and I'm your instructor, Jeffery Hicks. In this lesson we are going to kind of wrap up everything that we've covered in this course. I'll talk a little bit about what we've learned and why I hope you found it beneficial to go through all of the lessons. I'll talk about what things you should do next. Obviously this should just be the beginning of your work with PowerShell and Windows Server 2008 so I'm going to give you some tips on your next steps, your homework if you will. I'll also show you some things that we can do with PowerShell. Now that you kind of have a foundation there are other things that you can do with PowerShell, things such as managing Active Directory or SQL or IIS. I'm just going to give you a little taste, a little tease of those products and those solutions so you can see how easy it is to manage those other types of platforms and products. I'll also give you a list of resources, books and some websites that I find that are very beneficial for people who are working in PowerShell. So I want to make sure you have some of that and then I also want to give you some additional resources from TrainSignal. If you are continuing on in your training, I have some suggests to make sure you are as fully trained and capable for your job as you possibly can.