Implementing and Securing Windows Server 2016 Core Networking

Windows Server 2016 makes it easier than ever to meet even the strictest network security requirements. In this course, you learn step-by-step how to configure a production ready Windows Server 2016 network from the ground up.
Course info
Rating
(17)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 10, 2017
Duration
2h 43m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(17)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 10, 2017
Duration
2h 43m
Description

Windows Server 2016 isn't just a new version of Windows. It comes with a complete server and network virtualization platform that can replace much of the physical networking infrastructure in your datacenter. In this course, Implementing and Securing Windows Server 2016 Core Networking, you'll first use PowerShell to configure new Windows Server 2016 VMs. After that, you'll learn to implement IPv4 and IPv6, secure your network using IPSec and the Windows Firewall. Finally, you'll create your own software defined network and configure the distributed firewall. By the end of this course, you'll know how to configure static and dynamic IPv4 and IPv6 addressing, encrypt that traffic using IPSec, restrict traffic using both the Windows Firewall and the distributed datacenter firewall, and even implement your own software defined network! Best of all, you'll learn how to do all of this using PowerShell and group policy, so you can automate all of this if you want.

About the author
About the author

Ben Piper is an IT consultant and the author of "Learn Cisco Network Administration in a Month of Lunches" from Manning Publications. He holds numerous certifications from Cisco, Citrix, and Microsoft.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. This is Ben Piper, and welcome to my course, Implementing and Securing Windows Server 2016 Core Networking. I'm a published author and IT consultant, and in this course I'm going to show you step-by-step how to configure a production ready Windows Server 2016 network from the ground up. Windows Server 2016 isn't just a newer version of Windows Server. It includes a fully featured software defined networking stack, which makes securing your network easier than ever. In this course we're going to implement and secure a Windows Server 2016 core network from the ground up using Software Defined Networking or SDN, the distributed datacenter firewall, static and dynamic IPv4 and IPv6 configuration, the Windows firewall with advanced security, and Internet Protocol Security or IPsec. By the end of this course you'll know how to configure static and dynamic IPv4 and IPv6 addressing, encrypt that traffic using IPsec, restrict traffic using both the Windows firewall and the distributed datacenter firewall, and even implement your own software defined network. Best of all, you'll learn how to do all of this using PowerShell and group policy, so you can automate all of this if you want. Before beginning the course you should be somewhat familiar with Windows Server 2008 and later, group policy management, and PowerShell. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Windows Server 2016 core networking with the course, Implementing and Securing Windows Server 2016 Core Networking, only here at Pluralsight.

Configuring IPv4 Addressing
In this module we're going to configure IPv4 addressing. This sounds easy, but configuring IP addresses in PowerShell has some pitfalls that the GUI actually saves you from. We're going to encounter some of those pitfalls, and figure out how to work around them. Let's start by looking at the topology diagram again. FILE1, which is down in the bottom right quadrant, should have an IP address of 192. 168. 3. 101, and FILE2 should have the address 192. 168. 3. 102. Both of these should be members of the company. pri domain. Now right now we have not configured any of that, so in this module we're going to do four basic things. First, we'll set a static IPv4 address on FILE1, we'll then configure the DomainController to act as a DHCP server, and we'll use FILE2 as our test server to make sure it picks up a DHCP assigned IP address. After that we'll assign a static IP address to FILE2, and to close out the module we'll join FILE1 and FILE2 to the domain.