Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016

DirectAccess provides seamless and transparent always-on remote connectivity for Windows clients. This course will teach you how to plan for and implement a remote access solution using DirectAccess.
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 13, 2017
Duration
2h 32m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Overview of DirectAccess
Planning for DirectAccess
Configuring DirectAccess with the Getting Started Wizard
Configuring DirectAccess with the Remote Access Setup Wizard
Provisioning DirectAccess Clients
Supporting Windows 7 Clients
Description
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 13, 2017
Duration
2h 32m
Description

With today's highly mobile workplace, providing secure remote access for workers is crucial to supporting the highest levels of productivity in the organization. In addition, administrators are seeking better ways to more effectively manage the field-based assets. DirectAccess, with its seamless and transparent always-on remote connectivity, can help you meet both of these requirements. In this course, Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016, you will learn how to plan and implement DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. First, you will choose the best networking topology for DirectAccess. Next, you will install and configure DirectAccess using implementation and security best practices. You will follow with provisioning Windows 10 and 7 clients. With DirectAccess, you have access to the corporate network whenever you have a connection to the Internet, and you can access internal resources outside of the network the same way as you do inside. With consistent network access, IT administrators have a better view of and control over managed Windows clients configuration and security posture. By the end of this course, you will have an understanding of DirectAccess and how it can be implemented with Windows Server 2016.

About the author
About the author

Richard M. Hicks (MCP, MCSE, MCTS, MCITP:EA, MCSA, MVP) is a network and information security expert specializing in Microsoft technologies.

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More courses by Richard Hicks
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Richard Hicks and welcome to my course, Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. I am the founder and principal consultant at Richard M. Hicks Consulting. With today's highly mobile workforce, providing secure remote access for workers is crucial to supporting the highest levels of productivity in the organization. In addition, administrators are seeking better ways to more effectively manage their field based assets. DirectAccess can help you meet both of those requirements and more. This course will provide you with a high-level overview of direct access, and the Windows platform technologies that it comprises. You will learn how to prepare your infrastructure to support DirectAccess, and how to select the best network topology for the solution. You'll also learn how to install and configure DirectAccess using implementation and security best practices, and how to provision Windows 10 clients. In addition, you will understand the unique requirements and potential drawbacks for supporting Windows 7 on DirectAccess. Some of the major topics we will cover include infrastructure requirements to support DirectAccess, DirectAccess configuration options, provisioning Windows 10 clients, and supporting Windows 7 clients. By the end of this course, you'll know how to plan for an implement a secure remote access solution using DirectAccess on Windows Server 2016. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with basic Windows Server and Active Directory administration, DNS and name resolution, and IPv4 networking. Familiarity with Active Directory Certificate Services is helpful too. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn DirectAccess with Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016, at Pluralsight.

Overview of DirectAccess
Hello and welcome to Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. My name is Richard Hicks, I'm the founder and principal consultant of Richard M. Hicks Consulting. You can find me on Twitter @richardhicks, or visit my website, directaccess. richardhicks. com. In this module I want to provide you with a high level overview of DirectAccess, what it is and how it works. I'll show you what DirectAccess looks like in action, and then we'll compare and contrast DirectAccess with that of traditional client-based VPN. We'll explore some common use cases for DirectAccess in the enterprise, and we'll wrap it up with a discussion of the technologies that are required to implement a remote access solution using DirectAccess. If you're not familiar with DirectAccess, well, DirectAccess is a feature of the unified remote access role in Windows Server 2016. It provides seamless and transparent, always on, bidirectional, remote corporate network connectivity for managed Windows clients.

Planning for DirectAccess
Hello and welcome to Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016, this module is calling Planning for DirectAccess. In this module, we're going to talk about a number of things, so first I want to talk about the network topology, fundamentally the DirectAccess server is a network device, is a network access and security device, so where we place the DirectAccess server on the network is critically important. DirectAccess also relies on a number of Windows platform technologies to provide its services, so we're going to talk about how to configure things like Active Directory, DNS, and so forth. We will prepare the DirectAccess server, there are a number of things that need to be in place and configured on the DirectAccess server before we actually start installing it, and then finally, we'll install the remote access role itself.

Configuring DirectAccess with the Getting Started Wizard
Hello and welcome to Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. This module is entitled Configuring DirectAccess with the Getting Started Wizard. In this module, we're going to cover configuring DirectAccess using the getting started wizard, and that differs subtly from the more common and more popular Remote Access Setup Wizard, but the Getting Started Wizard has a couple of advantages and I want to show you those in this module, but it also has some important disadvantages that should be considered when you're deploying DirectAccess. In many deployment scenarios, using the Getting Started Wizard is not recommended, and we'll talk about those in detail here. And finally, we're going to show you how to configure DirectAccess using the Getting Started Wizard in our lab environment.

Configuring DirectAccess with the Remote Access Setup Wizard
Hello and welcome to Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. This module is Configuring DirectAccess with the Remote Access Setup Wizard. As I mentioned in the previous module, there's a couple different ways to configure DirectAccess. The first is using the Getting Started Wizard, and in this module, we're going to cover the Remote Access Setup Wizard. The Remote Access Setup Wizard has some distinct advantages over the Getting Started Wizard, so I'm going to make sure that you know what those are and why you should be using the Remote Access Wizard every time you install DirectAccess. And finally, we'll round out with a demonstration of configuring DirectAccess using the Getting Started Wizard.

Provisioning DirectAccess Clients
Hello and welcome to Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. This module is Provisioning DirectAccess Clients. Provisioning DirectAccess is fairly simple and straightforward as you'll see, doing so at scale can bring some challenges with it, so if you're deploying DirectAccess for a handful of clients, probably not a big deal, if you're doing it for many thousands or many tens of thousands of clients, it can be potentially problematic, so I want to provide you with a few of the techniques that I use to help streamline that process and make it a little easier and a little simpler for you and reduce some of that management burden, especially for managing many, many thousands of DirectAccess clients in your organization. Finally, we'll implement some client-side optimizations that can help improve the DirectAccess connection process and kind of streamline DirectAccess client connectivity when the DirectAccess client is outside of the network.

Supporting Windows 7 Clients
Hello and welcome to Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. This module is supporting Windows 7 clients. If you plan to support Windows 7 clients in your DirectAccess deployment, there are some unique implementation requirements, there's also some important drawbacks and limitations. The best experience for DirectAccess is with Windows 8 and Windows 10, Windows 7 clients are fully supported but there are some inherent disadvantages to supporting those in your environment, so I want to make sure that you're aware of all of those particular challenges. Finally, we'll talk about the DirectAccess Connectivity Assistant, this is an optional component that can be installed on the DirectAccess clients to provide some functionality that is missing on Windows 7 that is built into the Windows 8 and Windows 10 operating system.