WPF Productivity Playbook

This course contains a collection of tips, tricks, and techniques that will help you become a more productive and confident WPF developer, able to leverage the full power of the platform.
Course info
Rating
(69)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 22, 2016
Duration
2h 57m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Getting Productive with XAML Layout and Data Binding
Visually Editing Templates & Debugging Your UI
Writing Maintainable XAML Code
Using Blend for Behaviors, Animations, and Visual States
Leveraging WPF Framework Power Features
Description
Course info
Rating
(69)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 22, 2016
Duration
2h 57m
Description

This course, WPF Productivity Playbook, walks you through a couple dozen capabilities and techniques with WPF that will help you fully harness the WPF platform to build user interfaces that delight your users while letting you be as productive as possible writing clean, maintainable code. First, you'll to see some the best ways to be productive using the Visual Studio XAML designer to layout controls, as well as how to use drag and drop data binding features in the designer. Next, you'll use the template editing modes of Blend and Visual Studio to have a visual editing experience when working with custom controls, ControlTemplates, and DataTemplates. You'll also get some XAML coding guidelines that you can use when writing XAML by hand to make sure that code is easy to read and more maintainable. After completing this course, you'll be ready to unlock the full potential of Visual Studio and Blend tooling.

About the author
About the author

Brian Noyes is CTO and Architect at Solliance, an expert technology solutions development company. Brian is a Microsoft Regional Director and MVP, and specializes in rich client technologies including XAML and HTML 5, as well as building the services that back them with WCF and ASP.NET Web API.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, I'm Brian Noyes, and welcome to my course WPF Productivity Playbook. I'm a software architect who's been building applications and teaching courses on WPF since before its first release over a decade ago, but if you haven't already figured it out, WPF is alive and well, and still the best choice for building desktop applications, targeting Windows version 7-10. Whether you're brand new to WPF or have been working with it for years, you're sure to learn some great tips, tricks, and techniques from the demos and concepts in this course to help you be more productive building desktop applications with WPF. This course is mostly demo designed to be consumed in whole as a delicious meal of WPF or to snack on topic-by-topic to strengthen specific skill areas. Throughout the modules of this course, I'll walk you through some great tooling features in Visual Studio and Blend that can save you a ton of time creating rich UIs with WPF. Then I'll walk you through a number of powerful capabilities in the framework of WPF that will help you unlock the full potential of your desktop applications. WPF is a powerful framework, and I know you'll become a better and efficient WPF developer by watching all or portions of this course. So let's dive right in.

Getting Productive with XAML Layout and Data Binding
Hi, this is Brian Noyes, and welcome to WPF Productivity Playbook. This course is structured so that each module has a collection of tips, tricks, and techniques that help you solve specific problems or address a given scenario or requirement in WPF. You can watch this course end-to-end, and learn a ton of new things that you can then go start applying across all of your WPF development, or you can just jump right to a specific topic that interests you and consume the course in a more-reference like as-needed basis. So first up in this module, I'm going to take a look at some designer features. We'll start by looking at the XAML Designer layout, being able to drag and drop controls, and get them aligned, and oriented the way you want in the designer. Then we'll take a look at a collection of features that I refer to as drag and drop data binding. These are some features that were actually carried over from Windows Forms that give you a visual editing experience for adding controls to your views and having the data binding already hooked up nicely on them. Then we'll finish off by looking at some settings that let you get good debug information when bindings are not doing what you expect them to do, so let's jump right in.

Visually Editing Templates & Debugging Your UI
Hi, this is Brian Noyes. In this module of the WPF Productivity Playbook, I'm going to show you how you can leverage some great features that were introduced in Visual Studio 2013 and 2015 to visually edit ControlTemplates and DataTemplates. You'll also see how you can use some brand new features in VS 2015 that lets you work with the Visual Tree at runtime when you're debugging to inspect elements within the tree and even change their properties to see what the outcome of that is. This module is going to be almost all demos. First up, we're going to take a look at how you can get a visual editing experience when defining a CustomControl using some design features in Visual Studio Blend that have not made it in to the main Visual Studio IDE yet. After that, we'll look at editing control templates for CustomControls, built-in simple controls, or built-in composite controls using the Visual Studio XAML Designer. Then you'll see that you can have the same kind of visual editing experience when creating and editing DataTemplates for data bound control scenarios. Finally, we'll finish up looking at some really cool new debugging features that were introduced in Visual Studio 2015 update 2, that give you access to the entire Visual Tree of your running application in the debugger, both to understand what is there and to tweak or debug properties in the elements at runtime. So let's jump right in.

Writing Maintainable XAML Code
Hi, this is Brian Noyes. In this module of WPF Productivity Playbook, I'm going to dive into some things you can do to help make your XAML code more maintainable. Some of it involves leverages code editing and formatting features that are built into the IDE, but I'll also spend some time talking about XAML coding guidelines you can use when hand coding XAML to make it more readable and maintainable. First up were going to talk high level, and talk about some of the attributes or requirements you should have for your XAML code. Then we'll take a look at a small, but handy thing, how to control what editing mode the XAML Designer and Editor are in by default. Next we'll see how by changing a non-default setting, the code editor can do a nice job of formatting your XAML, so it's more readable and maintainable with a couple of quick keystrokes. Finally I'll talk about some XAML coding guidelines or standards that you should consider adopting to make your XAML code even more readable and maintainable, so let's get to it.

Using Blend for Behaviors, Animations, and Visual States
Hi, this is Brian Noyes. In this module of the WPF Productivity Playbook, I'm going to show you how to leverage several capabilities that Blend for Visual Studio has, that Visual Studio itself does not have. First up, I'm going to show you how to use Blend behaviors, and get them hooked up quickly through simple drag drop operations in the designer. Then I'm going to show you how to use the Animation Editor in Blend to quickly and easily define simple animations for elements in your application. Finally, I'll show you to how use the VisualStateManager, and use Blend to define your states, and easily implement animated transitions between them. So let's start with behaviors.