Description
Course info
Rating
(721)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 2, 2014
Duration
2h 35m
Description

In this course, you will learn to create a web service that supports a database with multiple relational tables using the Microsoft Stack and Breeze. You will create the tables and the relationships, model them in code, and expose them through Web API, first through native Web API and then assisted by Breeze. You will then create a minimal client to interact with the service.

About the author
About the author

Jesse Liberty is a Senior Consultant at Wintellect, where he specializes in Xamarin, Azure and Web development. He is a Certified Xamarin Developer, a Xamarin MVP and a Microsoft MVP.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Building the Database
Hi, this is Jesse Liberty for Pluralsight. In this module, we're going to take a look at Creating the Database through visual studio using Entity framework. We're gonna start with POCOs. That is Plain Old CLR Objects. We're going to create the model from the POCOs and we're going to do that using controllers that support Entity framework. We'll also populate the database by setting up a seeding of the database that will occur every time we rebuild the project and that way, we're always working with clean data during development.

Creating the Web Service
Hi, this is Jesse Liberty for Pluralsight. And this module is Creating the Web Service. In the previous module, we created our data model. In this module, we'll take a look at the repository pattern that decouples moving data in and out of the database from manipulating that data within your program. We will also take a look at REST. The API that we will be creating, will be RESTful, and we'll try to come to a working definition of what that means. We'll use Microsoft's Web API, and we'll take a look at how dependency injection can greatly simplify our programming. Finally, we'll take a look at convention over configuration, and what configuration is required to make our Web API work. And we'll take a look at JSON as our data format of choice.

Jasmine
Hi, this is Jesse Liberty from Pluralsight. In this module, we're going to take a look at how we can interact with the web API before we build the client. We can do that by creating tests with Jasmine that will exercise our web API and ensure that it's working as we expect.

Creating the Client
Hi, this is Jesse Liberty from Pluralsight. In this, the final module in our discussion of web API, we will take a look at creating a client to interact with the web service we've created.