Implementing a Self-hosted Docker Registry

At some point, you will outgrow storing custom images on Docker Hub. This course prepares you to deploy your own self-hosted registry.
Course info
Rating
(22)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 5, 2018
Duration
4h 8m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Deploying Your First Registry to Distribute Images
Registry Mirroring with a Pull-through Cache
Automating Builds with Notifications
Cleaning up Images and Configuring Storage
Securing the Registry
Preparing a Production Cluster Registry
Description
Course info
Rating
(22)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 5, 2018
Duration
4h 8m
Description

What would Docker be without Docker Hub? If it were not for images, you would never have heard of Docker, and that's because simplifying image distribution is what made Docker exponentially useful. Initially the images on Docker Hub suffice, but at some point, as you begin to build your own images, you'll outgrow storing them on Docker Hub for a variety of reasons. In this course, Implementing a Self-hosted Docker Registry, we will dissect deploying your own registry in the following scenarios. First, you will learn to take total control of a registry, perhaps as a matter of compliance, and learn to distribute sensitive images privately. Next, you will see how to co-locate a registry for performance reasons, to save bandwidth, or to mirror Docker Hub images to a local registry cache. Then, you will explore the internal workings of a registry and gain flexibility in securing your registry. Finally, you will be able to standardize application packaging and distribution within your organization using Docker images, to reap the same benefits that Docker Hub brought to open-source public applications. By the end of this course, you'll be well prepared to deploy your own self-hosted registry.

Course FAQ
Course FAQ
Who is this course for?

This course is for those who have outgrown stroing images on Docker Hub and need more control and flexibility through a self-hosted Docker Registry.

What are the main benefits of a Docker self-hosted registry?

A self-hosted Docker registry gives you complete control over the registry. It allows for a greater level of privacy, to see storage size, to push/pull images without internet connection, and it's free.

Are there prerequisites to this course?

You should be familiar with Docker, Docker Hub, and image distribution. If you aren't very familiar with Docker, check out this course on Getting Started with Docker.

What will I learn in this course?

You will learn how to prepare and deploy your own self-hosted registry by:

  • Taking control of a registry 
  • Learning to distribute sensitive images privately
  • Co-locating registries to save bandwidth 
  • Mirroring Docker Hub images to local registry cache 
  • Learning internal workings of a registry 
  • Standardizing application packaging and distribution
  • Much more
About the author
About the author

Wes Higbee is passionate about helping companies achieve remarkable results with technology and software. He’s had extensive experience developing software and working with teams to improve how software is developed to meet business objectives. Wes launched Full City Tech to leverage his expertise to help companies delight customers.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, my name is Wes Higbee. Welcome to my course Implementing a Self-hosted Docker Registry. From a high level, containers and images can seem mystical, thus all the components of Docker, for example, a registry, can seem overwhelming to understand. However, I've found that once I get under the hood and take a look at how things work behind the scenes, the complexity melts away. And one of the best ways to look under the hood is to run your own registry. And of course, self hosting affords a lot of benefits in having total control over a registry. We'll see these benefits by first deploying our own private self hosted registry and using it to push and pull images. We'll see up a registry mirror of Docker Hub. We'll look at Webhooks to trigger subsequent activities when new images are pushed to our registry, and then we'll get into some of the nuances of running your own registry. For example, cleaning up images and choosing a storage backend. We'll also talk about securing a self-hosted registry. And finally, we'll look at deploying a registry as a part of a production cluster of applications. Let's get started.