ITIL® Foundation: Lifecycle Phases and Processes

ITIL® is the global standard in IT service management frameworks. This course teaches you the overall framework from the five stages, to processes, and the functional operations groups, all to prepare you for the ITIL® Foundation certification exam.
Course info
Rating
(59)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 2, 2017
Duration
3h 42m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Service Strategy Introduction: It's All About Adding Value
Service Strategy Processes: Portfolio, Finances, and Relationships
Service Design Introduction: The Blueprinting Phase
Service Design Processes: Setting the Stage for Successful Delivery
Service Transition Introduction: Adding, Changing, and Retiring Services
Service Transition Processes: Approve, Manage, Deploy, and Document Change
Service Operation Introduction: Running and Supporting Live Services
Service Operation Processes: Where Services Are Visible to Customers
Service Operation Functions: Units of Organization to Accomplish Work
Continual Service Improvement Introduction: Getting Better All the Time
Continual Service Improvement Process: The Seven-step Process
Preparing for the ITIL® Foundation Exam
Description
Course info
Rating
(59)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 2, 2017
Duration
3h 42m
Description

You've watched other companies and organizations become supremely successful in IT service management (ITSM), and you're wondering how your company can do the same. In this course, ITIL® Foundation: Lifecycle Phases and Processes, you’ll take the core concepts of IT service management and learn how to apply processes within the five stages of ITIL®. First, you'll delve into how these processes help deliver value to the customer. Next, you’ll discover how these processes and phases work together to help your teams perform at top quality. Finally, you’ll explore the concepts necessary to apply functional roles within these processes. When you’re finished with this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge of the ITIL® framework and be prepared to take the ITIL® Foundation exam.

About the author
About the author

Chris is a radio and television personality, IT and project management junkie, trainer, traveler, pastor, and professional.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello, everyone, my name is Chris Ward, and welcome to my course, the ITIL Foundation: Lifecycle Phases and Processes. I'm an IT trainer and consultant at Chris Ward, LLC. I'm a project management professional, MCSE and ITIL expert as well. When delivering IT services in today's world, it is vitally important to understand how to set up a framework, a structure if you will, in order to deliver those services to your customers and help the business achieve its mission. This course is an accredited course to help you gain knowledge about the core concepts of IT service management, according to Information Technology Infrastructure Library, or ITIL as it is commonly called. It's also the second of two courses that will help prepare you to take the ITIL Foundation Certification Exam. Some of the major topics that we will cover include overviews of each stage of the ITIL Lifecycle, overviews of each process that are contained in the Lifecycle stages, and how those processes work together throughout the Lifecycle to effectively deliver IT services to your customers. By the end of this course, you'll know the basic concepts that undergird the ITIL Framework and how it will help you in performing proper IT service management. Before beginning the course, you should understand that this is an introductory-level course for ITIL. That means no previous knowledge is required. However, a basic understanding of the purpose of an IT service provider, as well as a basic understanding of IT in general, will definitely be to your advantage. From here, you should feel comfortable diving deeper into ITIL, with courses on Operational Support and Analysis, Release Control and Validation, and perhaps, ultimately, the Managing Across the Lifecycle course that will help prepare you for ITIL Expert. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn IT service management with the ITIL Foundation Lifecycle Phases and Processes course here at Pluralsight.

Service Strategy Introduction: It's All About Adding Value
Greetings everyone. Welcome to ITIL Foundation: Lifecycle Phases and Processes. My name is Chris Ward, and this is the second of two courses that prepare you for the ITIL Foundation certification exam, as well as introduces you to the world of the IT Infrastructure Library, AKA the ITIL framework of IT Service Management. All of here at Pluralsight are excited that you've set your sights on this valuable certification, and I'm confident that you will be able to pass the exam after take the two Foundation courses and using the many resources we have for you. If you haven't taken the ITIL Foundation Core Concepts course yet, I recommend that you start there first. If you just finished that course, then welcome back. Let's get started by looking at the very first of the lifecycle phases or stages as they are called, and the first one up for bid is of course Service Strategy. Let's see what we're going to cover here. First off, we will do a quick high-level review of the core concepts. Next we're going to dive into the purpose, objectives, and scope of this Service Strategy lifecycle stage, and we're also going to look at the business value of this stage in the ITIL lifecycle, as one of the key concepts in the ITIL framework is value to the business. And finally in this introductory module, we will look at the processes that make up this Service Strategy stage, things like service portfolio management and financial management for IT. Let's get started.

Service Strategy Processes: Portfolio, Finances, and Relationships
Well we made it into the Service Strategy Processes. Hi folks, Chris Ward here. Now that you've looked into the purpose and objectives of the Service Strategy lifecycle stage, it's time to dive into the processes. Remember that we only cover three of the five processes at the ITIL Foundation level. The two that we don't cover are Demand Management and Strategy Management for IT services. What's on the menu for our ITIL feast today? Well, quite simply it's a three-course meal of the purpose, objectives, and scope of Service Portfolio Management, or SPM as we like to call it, financial management for IT, and BRM, Business Relationship Management. Let's get started.

Service Design Introduction: The Blueprinting Phase
It's been said that by investing one hour of planning and design, you receive two to three hours back in delivering services. Hi folks, Chris Ward back with you again. I'm not sure that's a statistical study or not, but I have found in my personal journey in IT Service Management and Project Management that you must plan before you do. In order to do, you must plan. I probably should've used my Yoda voice with that statement. Here in this module, we are going to look at the overall Service Design stage of the ITIL lifecycle. It contains more processes than any other lifecycle stage, and it can be a bit daunting, but no worries, we're here to walk you through this, and get you up to speed on Service Design, and what it can accomplish in the delivery of services to your customers. Let's take a look at we'll cover in just a little bit more detail. First off, we'll look at the purpose, objectives, and scope of the Service Design stage. Then we'll see how Service Design adds value to our business, and how we deliver our services. Up next, we start getting into some big-picture ideas of Service Design that are fairly testable, like the five aspects of Service Design, and the four P's of Service Design. We'll also get a high-level overview of the Service Design Package or SDP, as it's called. It's the primary output of this lifecycle stage. And then, we'll finish up with a look at what processes we'll cover later on in the course.

Service Design Processes: Setting the Stage for Successful Delivery
Service Design can be very helpful in delivering your services, or it can cause it to be a train wreck. Planning and designing are so important these days; however, you can get caught up though in that paralysis of analysis. Some design efforts need to be part of a project, whereas others will be managed through the change process alone without a formally designated design project. Now in this module, we'll be looking at the processes that are tied initially to design. That doesn't mean that availability management isn't operating in Transition or Operation, but here is where it gets it's start. We are going to cover the eight processes from Service Design by once again looking at the purpose, objective, scope, and basic activities of Design Coordination, Service Level Management, Service Catalog Management, Supplier Management, Availability Management, Capacity Management, IT Service Continuity Management, or ITSCM for short, and finally ISM, or Information Security Management. The interesting thing is those last four are considered the warranty processes.

Service Transition Introduction: Adding, Changing, and Retiring Services
How many of you have worked or are working at an IT service provider that had a great strategy, created a great design for a new service, put it all together, and then just dropped it on your operations team? Show of hands here. Oh, I guess my hand is raised as well. I won't name the company, but it wasn't pretty, I'll tell you that much. Our service support team almost quit in force. That's why ITIL says that you should plan on transitioning from the design and development into operation. And as we'll see, you'll also not want to pull the plug on a service that you've offered for years without planning a smooth transition to retirement. I believe we are seeing how we set this all up here at the foundation level for each one of the lifecycle stages, and I think you'll understand. First off is the purpose, objectives, and scope of Service Transition. Then we'll see what value we have with this lifecycle phase or stage, and what it does to our businesses. And finally, we'll take a quick look at the service transition processes that we will cover. Just a heads up that just like Service Strategy, we don't cover all of the processes that are actually found in this lifecycle stage.

Service Transition Processes: Approve, Manage, Deploy, and Document Change
I can't encourage you enough to have this ITIL lifecycle phase operating in this organization. I have personally only operated in one organization that was ITIL based, and it was amazing; however, I have been teaching these principles as part of my project management background for years. Flipping the switch on a new service or pulling the plug on an old service is not something you do in a single day. These processes and transitions will help make sure that the requirements of Service Strategy that are encoded in Service Design will be realized in Service Operation. This is the bridge, folks. So, we will be covering five of the seven processes of Service Transition, and that means for us at the foundation level to understand the purpose, objectives, and the scope of transition planning and support, really similar to Design Coordination in overall scope. Service Asset and Configuration Management, or SACM as it's commonly called. Change Management, which is probably one of the few ITIL processes that exist in most organizations way before ITIL becomes the framework in that organization. Release and deployment management, and something that is shared in all lifecycle stages, knowledge management. This is the area where the Intermediate Capability module exam for release control and validation will be based if you choose to continue on in your ITIL certification journey. It's the processes that you see here in Service Transition.

Service Operation Introduction: Running and Supporting Live Services
Welcome to the lifecycle phase that almost everyone is familiar with, service operation. This is the day to day delivery and support of the services that bring value to the business and customers, but it's even more than that, as we're going to see. Chris Ward here, gang, and as comfortable as you might be with some of the concepts here, don't forget that the ITIL framework might not follow your organization activity for activity. And as we've said already in the two courses that we offer for ITIL foundation, ITIL is a framework that people can build their IT service management lifecycle upon. So definitely make sure that you keep your ITIL hat on when you're answering questions from this section on the exam. We're going to start off, as usual, with the purpose, objectives, and scope of the overall lifecycle phase or stage of Service Operation. We'll tie Service Operation together with how it provides and adds value to the business. This should be a no brainer for most of you in IT ops or in the service desk department. It's been said that communication is the key to project management in IT service management, but I'm going to add a caveat to that, proper and well thought out communication is vital to IT service management and especially here in Service Operation. And of course, we'll do our quick flyby of the Service Operation processes here to finish the module out as well as something kind of new called service functions.

Service Operation Processes: Where Services Are Visible to Customers
Your customers, for the most part, won't be there at the strategy meetings. Except for perhaps some research and/or part of a beta group, your customers won't even be actively involved in the service design and transition stages. When it gets real to the customers is when the services are being delivered in Service Operation, and remember what ITIL is all about, delivering services to your customers while bringing value to the business and customers. So we're going to look at the processes in Service Operation that helps us get that value realized. So we need to get ourselves delivering, don't we? We will once again bring you the basics of each of these processes, starting off with event management. It's a good place to start as even management feeds into all of these processes in operation as well as elsewhere in the ITIL lifecycle. Incident management is probably one of the most mature processes I find in organizations I work with. Why? Well because if you're delivering services to customers, there's going to come a time that that service is degraded or disrupted and we're going to need to fix it and so incident management to the rescue. Problem management, on the other hand, can be a bit misunderstood, and we'll fix that for you here. It's not always an incident or problem though that causes users to contact the service desk. Sometimes it's just a simple request, as we'll see here. And finally, we'll hit access management, it's the gatekeeper for our services. Lots to cover, so let's get started.

Service Operation Functions: Units of Organization to Accomplish Work
Hey folks, Chris Ward here. I forget where I worked at, but one of my cube mates had a sign up that said work would be great if it wasn't for the people. Now that's funny, but it's also a bit impossible. Without other people, whether you like them or not, we wouldn't get anything done in life, let alone IT service management. ITIL defines four functional groups that accomplish the work within Service Operation and we're going to look at them here in this module in a nice overview of all the functions. The overview basically shows you the names and titles of the functions that we find here in Service Operation. We'll dive deeper into the role, objectives, and structures of the service desk. Notice we don't say purpose and objectives, we say role and objectives. A process needs a purpose, a function needs a role to play. We'll also take a look at the role and objectives of technical management, which is very important. Also IT operations management, which is going to be broken down into two sub-functions of IT Ops control and facilities management, and we'll finish off with a quick look at application management.

Continual Service Improvement Introduction: Getting Better All the Time
Continual Service Improvement, it's the wonderful part of IT service management where you don't let grass grow underneath you because you're constantly moving, constantly improving. CSI is going to act in tandem with all the other lifecycle stages, all processes, activities, roles, services, and technology, they need to be constantly measured, and they are all subject to improvement. And make no mistake folks, this isn't all about big huge improvements. It's also about smaller more incremental improvements as well. So we are going to look at this last but certainly not least of the five lifecycle phases by starting off with the three amigos, purpose, objectives, and scope of CSI. We are also going to check on how it brings value to the business. And because we are constantly measuring to find out how to improve, we will look at the measurements, the CSFs or critical success factors, KPIs, and metrics inherent in proper CSI. And believe it or not, CSI follows other frameworks and standards, including the Deming Cycle from quality management. We'll gain an understanding of the six-step CSI Approach and finish off with a quick glance at the CSI Register, which is the document of all documents for continual improvement.

Continual Service Improvement Process: The Seven-step Process
While the other lifecycle phases have multiple processes, CSI concentrates all its firepower in one awesome process, the seven-step improvement process. And it's quite involved, but it's hugely successful when implemented consistently. Now remember that this is not the CSI approach, that's six questions versus seven steps, that's how I keep them apart in my rather full brain. This module is all about that seven-step improvement process. So as always, we're going to look at the purpose, objectives, and scope and also run you through a quick overview of the process. We'll also look at something fairly testable and also very helpful when it comes to understanding how we measure things. We're going to cover the three types of CSI metrics. So let's get this party started.

Preparing for the ITIL® Foundation Exam
Hey gang, Chris Ward here, and as we finish out the second of our ITIL Foundation courses, it's a great idea to give you some exam prep. For some of you, taking certification exams is a piece of cake, for others it's baking the cake. And there are a few that don't even know what cake is or you're gluten free. Regardless, we are going to help you get some pointers on taking the exam. We are going to essentially cover two areas here, first we are going to look at the ITIL Foundation exam itself and then I'll give you a short run through on how to register for the exam. Pluralsight is an authorized training center for ITIL by EXIN, by the way, and so we use PEOPLECERT as our examination virtual environment and that's what we'll show you how to get signed up for.