Maya Dynamics: Combining nCloth and Bifrost

Bifrost and nCloth are incredibly powerful tools inside of Maya. What if you could combine their strengths? This course teaches you how to drive nCloth simulations with key frame animation and then use the ncloth simulation to drive a bifrost liquid.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 11, 2017
Duration
1h 32m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 11, 2017
Duration
1h 32m
Description

Simulation tools offer great solutions to complex animations. However, there isn't one tool that can do it all. In this course, Maya Dynamics: Combining nCloth and Bifrost, you will learn how to use the strengths of nCloth and Bifrost to create a combined simulation. This course focuses on using Maya's simulation tools to create a giant blob capable of devouring anything in its path. Starting from simple object, your first task is to turn the shape into a physical volume. From there, the blob will find its own shape as it is allowed to roll around on a rigid surface. To add character, you will animate its direction to attack things along a city street. Finally, you will add a second dynamic layer allowing the blob to ooze and splash in its surroundings. When you are finished with this course you will have the knowledge to direct all types of liquid and semi-solid simulations. Software required: Maya.

About the author
About the author

Todd Palamar has worked in the computer animation industry for 23-years.

More from the author
More courses by Todd Palamar
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Todd Palamar, and welcome to my course, Maya Dynamics: Combining nCloth and Bifrost. I'm a training specialist at a game company in Central Florida. In this course, we're going to use Maya's simulation tools to create a giant blob that will roll down a city street and attack things along the way. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include using nCloth to create volumetric geometry, emitting Bifrost from an nCloth simulation, using key frames to key frames to influence an nCloth simulation, and how to have your simulation interact with your environment. By the end of this course, you will have an understanding of how nCloth and Bifrost can work together, as well as with secondary objects. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the basics of modeling, UV mapping, simple skin weighting, and key frame animation. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn about the ins and outs of Maya's simulation tools with the Maya Dynamics: Combining nCloth and Bifrost course, at Pluralsight.

Creating an Oozing Tendril
In this clip, we're going to review the current motion of our Bifrost simulation. Okay, so we can see here that the blob is working well. We're getting good Bifrost liquid. It is staying with our nCloth simulation, and it is rolling successfully down our street, and our truck is being absorbed there as well. Now what I didn't do was add the truck as a Bifrost collider, so I still want to go ahead and do that. And since this simulation looks pretty good, we'll also change that master voxel size. So let's go back in here and do that. The first thing is let's grab that container, and we're going to grab that high-resolution truck, and go to Bifrost Fluids, and choose Add, Collider. And then, let's go back down to our LiquidProperties node, and we're going to scroll to the top here and change that Master Voxel Size. We're going to add a 0 here so that we can get some really good definition out of that fluid. Now that's going to take a little while for that to update there and for it to process that new higher-res mesh, or that denser liquid. I've already cached this out and create a playblast. Let's take a look at the final results here of this particular shot. Now we can see that we're getting a very high-resolution Bifrost liquid attacking our truck and rolling down the street. This looks pretty good. This is the effect that we were after. This concludes our clip on reviewing the motion of our Bifrost simulation.