Description
Course info
Rating
(378)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 27, 2015
Duration
1h 51m
Description

Have you ever wished you could have a low hassle, easy to use, configurable way of building web applications in .NET? Maybe the ability to write a web application in just a few lines, as you can in Node.js? Well, OWIN gives you this, and then some. In this course, you will gain an understanding of how OWIN works and how it can do wonders for your .NET based web application development.

About the author
About the author

Chris Klug is a Swedish software developer and architect who loves to use code to solve problems, as well as talk about how to do it.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

What Is OWIN?
Hi, my name is Chris Klug. In this course, I will be talking about OWIN and project Katana. The goal is to give you a good view of what OWIN is, and how we can use it and project Katana to build really flexible web applications. But let's not spend more time on who I am and what I'm going to be talking about, let's just get started instead.

Building a Simple OWIN Pipeline
Hi, my name is Chris Klug. In this module, we're going to take a look at building a simple OWIN pipeline using project Katana. We're going to start off with the basics of getting the stuff we need from NuGet, and then we're going to slowly walk through the process of creating two different middlewares to build up the simple OWIN pipeline that can handle requests coming from clients.

Creating Middleware with OWIN
Hi, this is Chris Klug. In this module, we're going to take a look at how we can take one of the delegate-based middlewares from the last module and convert it into a proper reusable and reconfigurable piece of middleware that we can add into future projects. We're also going to make sure that it follows along with the patterns that everyone else is using when building middlewares. This makes it easier for people to use this middleware, because it follows along with the pattern that they are used to working with.

Integrating Frameworks
Hi, this is Chris Klug. In this module, we're going to have a look at how we can integrate third party frameworks into our pipeline when using Project Katana. So far, we've been looking at how to create our own middleware, but in a lot of cases we want to raise the abstraction level a little bit and start using a third-party framework instead of having to build everything on our own. In this case, we're going to look at how we can integrate NancyFx and ASP. NET Web API into our OWIN pipeline to help us with routing, based on the requested path.

Securing OWIN Pipelines
Hi, my name is Chris Klug. In this module, we're going to have a look at how we can use Project Katana in probably the most commonly used way. We're going to have a look at how we can use Katana to integrate security, or at least authentication, into our web applications. As all requests coming into our application go through the OWIN pipeline, it's a perfect place to put anything that's authentication related. As of the last few years, anything that is web authentication related, and is coming out of Microsoft, is coming out as Katana-based OWIN middlewares. This is why you will see Katana being included in any ASP. NET application that you create, based on a template that includes some form of authentication. So it's fairly important to understand how it works.

Integrating Social Media Authentication
Hi, my name is Chris Klug. In this module, we'll have a look at how we can integrate social authentication into our web applications using Project Katana. More specifically, we're going to have a look at how we can use Facebook and Twitter to perform the authentication for our application. We're going to walk through everything from creating a Facebook and Twitter application, to logging in our users using these. And through this process, you're going to see how extremely easy it is to use social logins in your web applications when you've got Project Katana helping you out.

Hosting an OWIN Pipeline
Hi I'm Chris Klug. In this module, we're going to have a look at two different ways that we can host our Project Katana-based OWIN pipelines outside of IIS. We're going to start off by having a look at how we can host it inside of our own application. In this case, a console application. We're then going to move on and have a look at how we can host it in memory to perform tests on our web applications without having to open external ports.