Description
Course info
Rating
(273)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 14, 2013
Duration
2h 39m
Description

This course is for .NET developers who want to try out Ruby on Rails without investing a significant amount of time into learning both Ruby and the Rails framework. In this course, we walk through what Ruby and Rails are, how they compare to .NET languages like C# and VB. After a brief introduction to the Ruby language, we jump into building a Rails application and customizing it.

About the author
About the author

Dustin is a co-founder of Developer Advocates, a freelance evangelism for hire outfit. He is also a co-host on the MashThis.IO podcast. As a PostSharp MVP, he regularly attends user groups, code camps and other developer events to speak about aspect oriented programming and a range of other topics.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Ruby and Rails
Hey everyone, welcome to Ruby on Rails: A JumpStart for. NET Developers. I'm Dustin Davis, and in this course we're going to quickly get up to speed with building applications using Rails, with as little friction as possible. This course is aimed at existing developers who preferably are familiar with. NET, C#, and ASP. NET Web Forms, or ASP. NET MVC. Since we'll be making comparisons between Ruby, Rails, and. NET, however, if you're coming from another platform in stack, you'll be just fine. Additionally this course is not a comprehensive introduction to the Ruby language or the Rails framework. This course is designed to give developers a running start in a short amount of time, and will only cover enough to accomplish that goal. By the end of this course, you'll know what to expect from both Ruby and Rails, and you'll be able to build a functional Rails application. Keep in mind as we go through this course, the examples and demos may not take the most appropriate course of action, as you would expect, and at times ignoring best practices. This is done for specific reasons of demonstrating functions and/or features. If you aren't a developer, I recommend starting with some of the beginner courses in the every growing Pluralsight library, before attempting this course. While you may actually learn something, there are times when certain topics may not make any sense and will only serve to frustrate you. We're going to cover getting Ruby and Rails installed along with some of the additional required libraries. We'll cover an introduction to the Ruby language including syntax, data and control structures. We'll cover an introduction to active record for data access. And of course we'll be covering the Rails framework by building a simple blog website. I wrote this course by making a few assumptions about you, the viewer. First, you've written code before, and are familiar with either C# or VB. NET syntax. You're familiar with object oriented programing concepts. You want to get up to speed as quickly as possible with the Rails framework. You have experience with web projects, either ASP. NET Web Forms or ASP. NET MVC. You don't know Ruby and you don't know Rails.