Start Coding with Scratch 2.0

Learning to code is an essential life skill and Scratch makes learning the concepts behind computational thinking, creative thinking, and programming easy with a graphical snap together programming language.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 14, 2017
Duration
3h 6m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction
The Scratch 2.0 Interface
Assembling Actor Sprites
Creating Stage Sets
Sprite Actors Follow Scripts
Backstage Code Stuff
Showtime and Summary
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 14, 2017
Duration
3h 6m
Description

Learning to code is an essential life skill in the 21st century. In this course, Start Coding with Scratch 2.0, you'll not only learn the amazing and free-to-use Scratch programming environment, but you'll also learn the exciting ideas behind computational thinking as well as coding language concepts. First, you'll explore Scratch's awesome interface. Next, you'll discover how to create vector and bitmap art in Scratch's paint editor. Finally, you'll animate and make your art interactive with Scratch's extremely helpful puzzle-piece code blocks that make learning how to program fun and easy. When you're finished with this course, you'll know basic coding concepts and have basic programming skills you can use as a launch pad for learning more advanced programming languages.

About the author
About the author

Mario Macari is an award winning illustrator, animator and graphic designer that fell in love with writing code. He develops and codes for major corporations and teaches coding classes at a couple of colleges in Southeastern Wisconsin. Mario Macari holds a BFA in Illustration and certificates galore from software companies.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Mario Macari, and welcome to my course Start Coding with Scratch 2. 0. I'm a graphic designer, coder, freelancer, college professor, and Pluralsight author. I've been working with graphic design and coding for a long, long time, and I've been creating art and interactions with computers for most of my career. I've also been teaching for many of those years. I hope you'll enjoy this course and sign up for Pluralsight. com. As a professor, I can tell you Pluralsight. com has some of the best courses out there. In this course, we'll explore Scratch 2. 0, a really great offline and online development platform where you can learn to program your very own interactive stories, games, and animations, and share your creations with others in the Scratch online community. All with the drop and drag block programming language. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include setting up a Scratch account, becoming familiar with the Scratch interface, creating sprites and backdrops with the paint editor, creating really cool, fun projects, sharing your projects on the Scratch website with family and friends. By the end of this course, you will have built multiple Scratch projects and will be introduced to how Scratch works. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn responsible web page design with this free course from the wonderful folks at Pluralsight. Welcome to Start Coding with Scratch 2. 0.

Introduction
Hi this is Mario Macari with Pluralsight, and welcome to the course Start Coding with Scratch. In this course, we'll learn about the Scratch user interface and how to put together some Scratch programs. Learning how to build programs and seeing them work is rewarding and fun. Plus, you'll be introduced to programming concepts along the way. In this module, we'll learn about some problems with learning how to code. We join the Scratch community and become a Scratcher. We explore the Scratch website. We learn about the different versions of Scratch and what each version is for. We download the offline editor for the Mac OS and for Windows. We talk about some of the things you can do with Scratch. We do our very first project and learn how to save it online and how to save it with the offline editor. We learn that a program has to have detailed commands in order for the program to work. We also introduce you to some programming concepts. So let's get started.

The Scratch 2.0 Interface
In this module, we take a bird's-eye view of the Scratch user interface. Scratch's motto is Imagine, Program, and Share. This is what you do in a Scratch project, and the interface makes this all possible. You start off with an idea in your head, then you create the idea into a program in Scratch, finally you share your Scratch creation with the whole world. In this module, we'll learn about how Scratch uses the metaphor of a theatrical play, we'll get familiar with the Scratch menu bar, we'll look at the stage, we learn how the coordinate system works on the stage, we discover backdrops in sprites in the built-in paint editor, we investigate where sprites are stored. We then talk about how Scratch rotates sprites, we cover the Sounds tab, we introduce the blocks palette and the Scripts pane. Finally we talk about the backpack, what it is and what you can store in there. So let's get started.

Assembling Actor Sprites
In this module, we learn how to create our own sprites using Scratch's built-in graphics editor. We'll look at the difference between vector and raster graphics. We'll study the paint window bitmap editor. We'll draw a bitmap turtle. We'll discover the paint window vector editor. We'll draw a vector turtle. We investigate what happens when you convert between vector and raster formats. We then talk about rotating bounding boxes and the center point. We look at how all our sprites need costumes. We cover how Scratch uses costumes for flip book animations. Finally, we introduce the vector type tool. So let's get started.

Creating Stage Sets
In this module, we take a look at a few ways of creating backdrops for our Scratch projects. We'll see that backdrops are important for your project. We learn that native anti-aliasing in the Scratch paint editor can cause troubles. We look at drawing electronically. We look at creating art with paper and pencil. We prepare a scan for coloring in Scratch with Adobe Photoshop. We paint a backdrop in Scratch's paint editor. We discover some problems with using bitmap gradients. So let's get started.

Sprite Actors Follow Scripts
In this module, we look at building programs by stacking code blocks. We learn how to create an emoji paint program. We get familiar with block categories. We look at block shapes. We learn how programs follow code stacks. We discover computers can run two code stacks seemingly at the same time. We have two sprites broadcast messages to each other. We investigate making clones. We send our turtle sprite through simple and complex mazes. We cover the creation of function-like block stacks in Scratch. So let's get started.

Backstage Code Stuff
In this module, we look at backstage code stuff. We introduce computational thinking. We make a turtle graphic draw a square. We learn the concept of D. R. Y. , or don't repeat yourself. We learn coding is tricky and it takes persistence. We make spinning balls of color. We draw a bouncing line. We try the turbo mode. We create a fractal tree. We make a color spinner. We ask a fish to decide. We make a Martian music machine. And finally, we review some of the concepts we already covered. So let's get started.

Showtime and Summary
In this module, we look at getting an audience for our Scratch project. We'll get familiar with sharing your project on the Scratch website. We'll discover how to embed our project into an HTML page. We'll investigate remixing an existing project on Scratch. Finally, we'll learn about Snap, a Scratch-like programming environment that plays on iOS devices. So let's get started.