Word 2013 Fundamentals

If you are new to Word or Word 2013, this course will walk you through some basics to get you started including navigation, formatting, creating tables and charts, coauthoring and collaboration, and more.
Course info
Rating
(95)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 25, 2014
Duration
7h 23m
Table of contents
Introduction to Word 2013
Navigating, Selecting, and Entering Text
Editing and Proofing Text
Formatting Text
Working With Paragraphs
Bulleted, Numbered, and Multilevel Lists
Introduction to Formatting Pages
Working With Text Boxes
Introduction to Tables
Introduction to Pictures and Video
Introduction to SmartArt and Charts
Introduction to Coauthoring and Collaboration
Course Conclusion
Description
Course info
Rating
(95)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 25, 2014
Duration
7h 23m
Description

Learn about the most popular features packed into Word 2013 to create better looking, more flexible, and sharable documents. In this course, author Heather Ackmann covers some basics as well as some often overlooked Word 2013 features and shortcuts that will satisfy beginners to the more intermediate office workers. Upon completion of this course, you will be quite proficient in wielding Microsoft Word, making you ready to learn more advanced tasks in Word.

About the author
About the author

Heather Ackmann is an accomplished instructor with a decade of teaching experience, helping students at the high school, college, and adult levels in a variety of topics. Specializing in Microsoft Office computer applications, she is a Microsoft Office Certified Master and holds a degree in English and Secondary Education.

More from the author
End-user Communications for Better IT
Beginner
2h 37m
May 17, 2017
Word 2016 for Power Users
Beginner
2h 23m
Dec 21, 2016
Microsoft Word (2016): Essentials
Beginner
1h 32m
May 4, 2016
More courses by Heather Ackmann
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Word 2013
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Introduction to Word 2013, the first module to our Word 2013 Fundamentals course. If you are brand new to Word or upgrading from a previous version of Word, this will be a tremendously valuable video to watch. Learning a new program or moving to a new version of a program is a lot like moving to a new city. You can awkwardly stumble through it on your own or go on a guided tour. Trust me. The guided tour is way better. So, consider this module a guided tour of your new Word 2013 working environment. In this particular module I'll walk you through things like how to create a new document or open an existing one, introduce you to some new features such as signing into Word with your Microsoft account or opening a PDF inside Word to edit, and I'll also show you where the common commands and tools live within the interface. In subsequent modules we will be exploring a lot of other popular and useful features essential to working in Word, so let's get started.

Navigating, Selecting, and Entering Text
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Navigating, Selecting, and Entering Text. If you are brand new to Microsoft Word, self taught, or just an occasional user to Word, this will be a valuable video to watch because everything shown in this video is not something that is necessarily intuitive to figure out on your own, and more importantly this video is designed to make you faster in working with Microsoft Word documents.

Editing and Proofing Text
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Editing and Proofing Text. Even if you are a master with spelling and grammar and an expert typist, I'll wager that you still make mistakes when working with long documents. Luckily Word 2013 comes loaded with some tools to help you check your document for potential errors or quickly locate text you know is incorrect.

Formatting Text
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Formatting Text, a topic which in and of itself can either be a very simple topic or a very confusing and complex topic for most beginners. As such, this module is structured with that in mind. We're going to start simple and apply basic on the fly formatting changes to elements in a document, but then we're going to make formatting a bit more complex as we get into a little something called styles, which for most novice users to Word is something that is hard to grasp. But don't worry. I will try my best to make it easy to understand.

Working With Paragraphs
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Working with Paragraphs where we will cover a variety of topics related to formatting paragraphs including alignment, indents, line and paragraph spacing, my personal favorite tab stops, and columns. We'll also touch on a few more slightly advanced topics that come in handy when working with columns like hyphenation, kerning, and tracking or character spacing.

Bulleted, Numbered, and Multilevel Lists
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Bulleted, Numbered, and Multilevel Lists.

Introduction to Formatting Pages
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Introduction to Formatting Pages. In this module we'll be covering formatting options that are related to pages as a whole. We'll cover things like page and section breaks, margins, headers and footers, page numbers, line numbers, and watermarks.

Working With Text Boxes
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Working with Text Boxes. A text box is a movable, resizable container for text or graphics. In Word, a text box is simply an object just like a shape, a picture, or table that you add to a page to set off or set apart specific text from your document's main text. Text boxes are handy in that you can place text virtually anywhere within the document. As such, text boxes are often used to draw attention to specific details, key facts, or extra information pertaining to your document as a whole. In Word 2013 you have a number of preformatted text boxes from which to choose or you can draw or create your very own text box.

Introduction to Tables
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Introduction to Tables. You can use Word tables to create a variety of things like lists, calendars, or even use tables to structure or format information on a page. For example, it is not uncommon to see resumes formatted with Word tables. In fact, there are some resume templates that you can download from office. com that use this technique to lay out information. Now, I personally don't prefer to use tables for that purpose mainly because doing so can create problems in third-party programs. Oftentimes potential employers will ask you to upload your Word resume into some electronic database system, and depending on the system it may have trouble interpreting the information inside of a Word table or in converting the information to some other format, so for that reason I don't generally recommend using tables to format a resume. However, if your end goal is to simply print out your resume then using a table to format can in some instances make it easier to control the layout or the look of information on that page. So, the bottom line is tables can be used and are used for a variety of purposes, not just to create a table of numbers.

Introduction to Coauthoring and Collaboration
Welcome back. I'm Heather Ackmann, and this module is Introduction to Coauthoring and Collaboration. Now, before we get started I thought I'd like to clear up some terminology first between the words coauthoring and collaboration. Now, in a lot of context coauthoring and collaboration basically mean the same thing, that is unless we are talking about a software's capabilities. With Microsoft Word these two terms mean slightly different things. Coauthoring in essence refers to the ability for multiple authors to be working on the same document at the same time and to be able to see another person's changes or edits as they happen. Coauthoring is a fairly recent addition to Microsoft Word made possible through Word Online and OneDrive. Now, collaboration on the other hand refers to several specific features in Word that have been around a long time, features such as the ability to track changes in a document or make comments, compare documents, or even share the document. These are tools and features that make working with others on document creation easier, just not necessarily at the same time. Now, in this module I will be introducing you to both coauthoring and Word's collaboration basics.