Cisco CCIE Security: Addressing and Protocols

This course is a starting point for CCIE Security Candidates to review the essential skills required to qualify for the CCIE Security Lab Exam. This course covers a number of familiar topics related to addressing protocols and IP Routing.
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Aug 30, 2014
Duration
5h 28m
Table of contents
Introduction to the Course
Network Addressing Basics
OSI Layers
TCP, UDP, and IP Protocols
LAN Switching: Part 1
LAN Switching: Part 2
Basic Functions and Characteristics of RIPv2
Basic Functions and Characteristics of EIGRP
Basic Functions and Characteristics of OSPF
Basic Functions and Characteristics of MP-BGP
Next Steps in CCIE Security Preparation
Description
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Aug 30, 2014
Duration
5h 28m
Description

The CCIE Security Written Exam is the qualifier for the CCIE Security Lab Exam. Candidates must demonstrate a solid understanding of fundamental networking skills before attempting the lab exam, and those skills include a knowledge of the IP Protocol, the TCP/IP stack, and basic routing fundamentals. This course reviews these technologies, focusing on important topics that must be understood by any CCIE Security candidate. This course is not designed to introduce new information, however, it covers information that should be very familiar to any candidate. As you complete these modules you will solidify your understanding of the TCP/IP protocol stack, RIPv2, OSPF, EIGRP, and MP-BGP. I'll also give you a few tips to continue progressing toward CCIE Security certification.

About the author
About the author

Brandon is a CCIE (Security, #23837), Cisco Press author, and has over 13 years experience as a Cisco Instructor.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Basic Functions and Characteristics of RIPv2
And welcome to Basic Functions and Characteristics of RIPv2, this is part of the CCIE security written exam certification. And we're going to talk a little bit about distance-vector routing over the next couple of minutes here. So many of you are probably already familiar with distance-vector routing. It's based on the premise of how far a device is, or a network is, and in what direction? So a pretty simple concept, but essentially that's what distance-vector means. Now, typically your distance-vector routing protocols are going to have a higher administrative distance then your link state and hybrid routing protocols. And that's because those link state and hybrid routing protocols are considered to be more accurate. So if we had to break a tie between them, we would certainly want the more accurate routing protocol to be the preferred routing protocol. So with distance-vector routing, our routers are going to pass periodic copies of the entire routing table to their neighboring device, and this is regardless of whether that neighbor is running the routing protocol or not. So every 30 seconds with RIP, we're going to take those routes, and we're going to pass them right out of our interface. And if there is a neighbor that's running RIPv2, then it will go ahead and receive that update, and go ahead and process it into its routing table. The routing information protocol is what we call RIP, but more typically today we deal with RIPv2 which has some modifications made to it that make it a little bit more friendly in today's networks. But both of these protocols, RIP and RIPv2, these are both distance-vector routing protocols.

Basic Functions and Characteristics of EIGRP
Welcome to Pluralsight, everybody. This is Basic Functions and Characteristics of EIGRP, and we're going to talk about EIGRP for a little bit here, mainly a review because as a CCIE security candidate you probably already have some foundational knowledge of EIGRP, so we're just going to review it over the next little bit here.

Basic Functions and Characteristics of OSPF
Welcome to the Basic Functions and Characteristics of OSPF. In this lesson, we're going to take a look at OSPF. Give an idea on how Link-State Routing works or at least, take a little bit of the time to review Link-State Routing. And then talk about how to configure OSPF and OSPF authentication. So, let's start out with a review of Link-State Routing. So I know many of you are already familiar with Link-State Routing. And the first thing to point out is that between my Link-State routers, my routers running a Link-State Routing Protocol, we exchange Link-State advertisements. And these are flooded throughout the entire domain here. Now, if we were to take this router here and we put this router out over here. That router will create what we call a Link-State Database. Now, it creates that Link-State Database and it places itself as the root of the tree. And then from there, it's going to run the Dijkstra algorithm and calculate the shortest path to each destination that we see here in this topology. Once it does that and calculates the shortest path, that's going to go into the routing table. So just like we saw with EIGRP and how it maintained multiple tables. Link-state Routing protocols, much like OSPF and ISIS are going to maintain multiple tables, as well. Let's take a look at the tables that Link-State Routing protocols maintain.

Basic Functions and Characteristics of MP-BGP
All right everybody, in this module we're going to cover the basic functions and the characteristics of multi protocol BGP. Beginning at a high level review of BGP, BGP is a distance vector or a path vector routing protocol. So it has a number of enhancements over your standard distance vector, where we have reliable updates and triggered updates. We also use path attributes to develop our metric, and really, BGP is what's designed for very large routing domains. Now, BGP does use reliable updates. And BGP establishes a connection with a neighbor on TPC port 179. So, think ACLs for your firewalls that are in the transit path there. Now, also, BGP does not do periodic updates, and it uses keepalives to maintain that TCP connection with a neighbor. It does batched, triggered updates, and those are done at five second intervals for internal peers and 30 seconds for external peers.