ICE Nodes Reference Library: Color

In this tutorial, we will be taking a detailed look at each of the Color nodes found in Softimage's Interactive Creative Environment. Software required: Softimage 7 and higher.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Sep 25, 2008
Duration
52m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Sep 25, 2008
Duration
52m
Description

In this tutorial, we will be taking a detailed look at each of the Color nodes found in Softimage's Interactive Creative Environment. Each video in this course is a self-contained tutorial centering on one of the nodes found in ICE within Softimage. This means that these tutorial can be viewed in any order you wish, allowing you to jump straight to the content that is most relevant to you. These tutorials will take a detailed look at each of the nodes found within the Color section of ICE and we'll learn how they can be used to speed up our workflow. Software required: Softimage 7 and higher.

About the author
About the author

Originally from Lagos, Nigeria, Sunder has made great headway in both the interactive game design and 3D animation worlds.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
The Add Color node will output the sum of multiple color values. You have the ability to clamp your color output, by the way, so you can prevent excessively bright colors. Let's see this node in action, and what we'll build is this teapot, and we'll set it up so that anytime the teapot gets near some particles they'll brighten up. We're going to do this not directly with the teapot, thought it's possible, we're actually going to set it up with the help of a Null. So drop a Null in, place it underneath the teapot, and now change some of the settings on here, hit the Enter key. Let's hit the Shatter Display Icon type to a box, and let's just set the scale size to maybe 2 x 1 x 2, for example. Alright, that should do the trick. Now make this Null a child of the teapot anyhow you want. I'll use the slash tool with the Null selected, and middle-click the teapot to set it as the parent. Now anywhere we grab the teapot and move it around, the Null will follow along. And all we have to do is check if the particles are in the Null, and if they are we'll just use the Add Color node to brighten them up. So we'll need to get some particles in here before we get around to doing that. So we'll go to Model, Get, Primitive, Point Cloud, and let's drop in Disc. So the Disc should be just fine. Let's reduce the Outer Radius, it's pretty tiny, and let's take the Inner Radius and increase it a little bit more. Now take the number of your U divisions and really crank it up. Let's try 24, let's double that, there we go, and actually let's double that as well so we have a whole bunch of these particles in here, and we can also increase the V value, like that. So we just have a circular setup of particles in here. Now with these particles selected, go to Create, ICE Tree. Basically, like I said, we're going to check and see if the Null is the particles are in the Null and change the color based on that relationship. So if we want to change that color, we will use a node called set particle color, a very useful node. Let's drag and drop that in, and execute it. You could also use a Set Data node with Self. Color as the reference, it's the same thing. So now we basically have our particles set to this color. What we'll do now is we'll introduce the Add Color node, and we'll use that and supply the color with this Add Color node. So we can set the Value1 or 2 to whatever value we want and it will add the two together, clamp them, and then set that as the output value. If you don't want to clamp it, by the way, you have other choices in here as well. So now it's adding gray to black, so we're only getting gray. Think of black as all 0 and gray as 0. 3 all the way through, and it's basically adding those together and getting us one final color output. Now we'll use a node called test inside null, and with this node we'll check to see if the particles are within the null. All we have to do is provide the Null name, so select it, hit F3, drag and drop it in, and connect Out Name into Null Name. And then if it's true, we'll basically change one of these values in here, maybe the gray color. Instead of adding black to gray, we'll add black to another color if it's True. So introduce IF, drop that in, plug Result into Condition, so if it is within the Null we can choose to add a specific color, add the Result in here like that. So now if it's within here we can add black, or if it's True we can add maybe red, and if it's False we can add black. Black is 0, so when you add 0 to 0 you get 0 back, so that's our original color. But if it's True, we'll add red to black and we'll get red. Now wherever we move the teapot that moves the Null. Anytime there are particles within it, those surrounding particles here will get lit up just like that. So that's a look at using the Add Color node to basically add any output color, be it red or black, to another color to get one final result. It's just pure addition of the different red, green, and blue components, so that's all there is to this node.