Implementing Proactive Windows Security

In this course, you will learn how to implement proactive solutions needed to defend against the most-used attack vectors of today and how to prepare your environment for the post-2015 security landscape.
Course info
Rating
(40)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 22, 2016
Duration
2h 9m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction
Protecting a Computer by Implementing BitLocker
Increasing Security and Performance by Limiting Privileges
Protecting Admin Privileges with UAC
Whitelisting Secure Applications by Using AppLocker
Preventing Pass-the-Hash and Pass-the-Ticket Attacks
Protecting Networks by Using IPsec
Description
Course info
Rating
(40)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 22, 2016
Duration
2h 9m
Description

In the future, the only way to secure Windows environment will be to implement proactive security and to stop relying only on reactive solutions like anti-malware. In this course, Implementing Proactive Windows Security, you will learn how to move from dead, reactive security measures to effective and proactive security measures. First, you'll learn how to implement BitLocker drive encryption in Windows. Next, you'll learn about protecting admin privileges with UAC and how UAC can be your best friend. Finally, you'll get a better understanding of IPsec - and why it's not as bad as people make it out to be. By the end of this course, you'll know how to design and implement proactive security in a Windows network, helping you better secure your environments for 2016 and beyond.

About the author
About the author

Sami Laiho is one of the world's top experts in Windows OS and Security. Sami specializes in OS internals, troubleshooting, management, and security.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone, my name is Sami Laiho, welcome to my course, Implementing Proactive Windows Security. I'm a senior technical fellow at my own company called Adminize. Security's always a compromise between security, usability, and cost. You can always get two, but never three. In the future, the only way to secure Windows environments is to implement proactive security and forget about trusting only reactive solutions like anti-malware. This course takes you through needed to sign and implementation considerations, while moving your company from reactive to proactive security. Some of the major topics that we will cover include what level of BitLocker security is really worth it, how do you really get rid of admin rights, and why IPsec is not as bad as people make it sound like. By the end of this course, you'll know how to design and implement proactive security in a Windows network. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the basics of Windows operating systems.

Increasing Security and Performance by Limiting Privileges
In this module, we're going to talk about the second most important thing with security, which is to implement the principle of least privilege. In the previous module, we already discussed about the immutable laws of security, and one of them being that we have to implement the principle of least privilege. By implementing the principle of least privilege, we can make sure that no one will break the second rule, which is to implement the hard disk encryption. There are many reasons why we want to limit the use of high-privileged accounts. First of all, it's security. The only way to prevent installation of malicious software is sadly, to prevent installation of legal and good software as well. Many people tell me that I'm doing a negative thing by taking away something from them. It's not just a security issue, but it is actually also good for your computer, and I'm trying to make your computer work and perform better. The more rights you have, the more garbage you can write to your disk. I'm going to show you this in a demo in a short while. Group policy is a cool thing to manage computers, but the thing is that if you have group policy settings, but you have admin rights at the same time, the admin can always remove your group policies. So to keep compliance, you cannot allow users to be running admin. Since the beginning of NT, back in 1993 starting with NT 3. 1, there has been this base rule that you cannot have admin rights on your computers if you want to have any kind of security. Next we're going to take a look at how these admin rights affect your computer, and how they actually make them perform worse.