CentOS Enterprise Linux 7 Operation Essentials

Following on from the LFCS: Linux Essentials, this course will extend your administration knowledge of CentOS 7 and covers such topics as managing the boot loader and software management.
Course info
Rating
(54)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 18, 2018
Duration
6h 50m
Table of contents
Introducing the Linux Foundation and LFCS Certification
Starting and Stopping CentOS 7
The Boot Process
Managing GRUB2
Managing Linux Processes
Process Priority
Monitor Linux Performance
Using Sysstat to Monitor Performance
Managing Shared Libraries
Scheduling Tasks in Linux
Log Files and Logrotate
Introducing SELinux
Managing Software on CentOS 7
Configuration Management Tools
Description
Course info
Rating
(54)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 18, 2018
Duration
6h 50m
Description

This is the second course in a series of courses designed to support the Linux Foundation Certified SysAdmin and the Red Hat Certified System Administrator practical exams. Based on CentOS 7.2 this course will help you manage your server of the long haul over its operational lifetime. Monitoring the server, managing logs and updating software are all topics that are included in this extensive course.

About the author
About the author

Andrew is a committed evangelist of the Linux Operating System and the concept of community and freedom that it provides. He has worked as a technical trainer since 1995 and has taught throughout the world, including Australia, the US, Germany and Eastern Europe. Andrew started teaching Linux in 2004 when Novell acquired SUSE and has been a long time supporter of Novell and provides SYSOP support the the Certifed Novell Instructor community on Linux. Andrew founded theurbanpenguin and has been submitting video training material to his YouTube channel since 2009 and currently has over 8,500 subscribers and 1.6 Million views. Andrew has had two publications with Packt: Citrix Access Gateway VPX Essentials (2012) and Citrix XenApp (2013).

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Managing Linux Processes
Hello, and welcome to this presentation from Pluralsight. My name is Andrew Mallett, and I'm here as your instructor to help guide you through managing Linux processes. So when you're ready, sitting comfortably, we're going to begin. In particular, we're going to be looking at identifying resource utilization by process. We'll be verifying the integrity and availability of key processes. Now to make sure that this all work for you, we'll be running through multiple demonstrations ensuring you get the best out of this course and, in particular, this module. So we'll be using the ps command, or the process status command, and looking at some of the available options. We'll be looking at how we can monitor process utilization from the /proc directory and making use of the $$ variable. We'll be managing our processes with the kill command, so a little bit of death and destruction never goes a miss. But we'll also be looking at how we can use shortcuts, so looking at the pgrep command and the pkill command. And we'll finish up by seeing how we can manage a lot of this just by the use of the command top. So we can get started within the next clip looking at our first demonstration making use of the ps command.

Process Priority
Hello, and welcome to this presentation from Pluralsight. My name is Andrew Mallett, and I'm here to, you know, as your instructor to help guide you through this module, Process Priority. So sit comfortably, fasten those seatbelts, and we're going to start our journey. But in particular, we're looking at the objective to change the priority of a process. To get you there and make sure you achieve this objective, we're going to be filling in a few demonstrations here. We're going to be looking at how we can background tasks, so that will mean looking at the jobs command. You'll be looking at the shortcut on the keyboard, Ctrl+Z, to send a suspend signal through to a process. We'll be looking at bg and fg commands. With that done, we're going to move on then to the nice and renice command so we can look at how we can configure the process priority for a given task. So we're going to begin with our first demonstration straightaway looking at backgrounding tasks, so see you back in a few seconds for the next clip.

Log Files and Logrotate
Hello and welcome to this Pluralsight presentation. My name is Andrew Mallett and I'm here as your instructor to help guide you through the module where we take a look at log files and how we use the logrotate mechanism in CentOS 7. In particular in this module we're going to be taking a look at locating and analyzing system log files, monitor security and conduct audits, along with a little bit more scripting where we can start looking at automating our tools to make our work a little bit faster and a little bit more accurate. For our demonstrations to keep you up and running and knowing what's going on, we're going to be running an audit of login events. We'll be auditing access to the sudo or su commands. We'll be seeing how we can start scripting with awk to analyze our logs. We'll be configuring system logging so we'll be looking at the rsyslog daemon. We'll be looking at how we can rotate those log files using logrotate, and finally we'll finish up by looking at journalctl and how that works in our systemd environment. So let's begin by auditing our login events.

Introducing SELinux
Hello, and welcome to this Pluralsight presentation. My name is Andrew Mallett, and I'm delighted to be your instructor today to introduce you to SELinux, the mandatory access control list. Now in meeting the objectives, we're going to be taking a look at how we can identify the SELinux, the secure Linux files and processes. As well as this, we'll be looking at how we can configure or modify our SELinux policy, so it's geared to work more the way that we would like. We'll, of course, be working through demonstrations, and we're going to make sure that you understand what SELinux is, and it's a mandatory access control system as is AppArmor. And of course, it just sits on top of the existing discretionary access control lists. But the discretionary access control lists are more easily modified, whereas the SELinux system is that much more complex, so we can kind of guarantee the system is going to be working better. And those people who might have the rights to change file permissions are unlikely necessarily to have the same rights to start modifying your SELinux policies. As we go through, we'll be looking at how we can view the SELinux status and understand the different modes and context. We'll be looking at viewing the SELinux logs and using some of the tools that we can use to start modifying SELinux. We'll be working with the SELinux Booleans, as well as working with SELinux ports and just seeing how we can use these to easily adjust our SELinux policies. Our first stop is going to be looking at how we can take a view of SELinux, seeing what status it's at, and understanding the SELinux modes, the three modes that we have and the different contexts that we have.

Managing Software on CentOS 7
Hello, and welcome to this presentation from Pluralsight. My name is Andrew Mallett, and I'm here as your instructor to help guide you through the module where we take a look at Managing Software on CentOS 7. We'll quickly run through some of these objectives. So we'll be looking at updating the operating system, updating software and the reality is the operating system itself is a type of software after all, isn't it? We'll be looking at updating the kernel and even ways that we can prevent the kernel from being updated. We'll be looking at managing the startup process and services. And pretty much here, we're looking at when we install services how we can enable and start the services. We'll be looking at how we run updates, both from the web through our online repositories and through local filesystem repositories. We'll be looking at how we can work with source software and installing software from source. And you know we're going to give you plenty of demonstrations. So we're going to look at how we can use the RPM command for software management, we'll be looking at then how to make a start with YUM, and we'll look at how we work and create our own YUM repository files. We'll be seeing what happens and how we work with the YUM cache. We'll look at how we can control and how the kernel is updated. We'll look at, as we say, working with our services and working with our source code. We'll begin in the next clip looking at how we manage software with RPM.