mental ray Nodes Reference Library: Sample Compositing

In this series of tutorials, we'll be taking a detailed look at each of mental ray's sample compositing nodes. Software required: Maya 2008 and up.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Mar 25, 2009
Duration
34m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Mar 25, 2009
Duration
34m
Description

In this series of tutorials, we'll be taking a detailed look at each of mental ray's sample compositing nodes. Each video is a self-contained tutorial centering on one of mental ray's nodes. This means that these tutorials can be viewed in any order you wish, allowing you to jump straight to the content that is most relevant to you. Over the course of these tutorials, we'll learn how each node works and best practices to utilize for attaining desired results while saving time. Software required: Maya 2008 and up.

About the author
About the author

Kyle was one of the first authors for Digital-Tutors (now a Pluralsight company) and has been a part of the team for over 10 years. Kyle began his career in computer graphics education as a college instructor and worked as a Digital-Tutors rendering tutor and curriculum manager since 2002.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
[Autogenerated] in this lesson. We're gonna take a look at the M I beat. Continue sample compositing Note nowthe continue note. Will basically tell anything in our scene Wherever that note is used, any kind of a ray tracing Ray will continue right through that Material, in other words, will receive really no interaction whatsoever. So in order to use this, we first need to have some kind of a material dropped into our scene. And just to make this a little bit different, let's take the DGS material. Give it some kind of a nice green color. So that way it's able to stand out and be different. Let's drop this underwear object and see what we get whenever we render, so you can see whatever we render out our image. We have this nice green dgs material dice. Now let's see what we can do with the continue note to actually make this dice, not rentable. So what we first need to do is take this TGS note or any kind of a material that we use any kind of a metal rain owed and take a look at its output connections so we can expose the shading group right. We need to get to this note. And what we basically will have to do is use the compositing note to bridge the connection between these two. So let's go down to the sample compositing note. Take a look inside the sample compositing tab and we want to use Continue. So continue. We use as the input use this DGS material. And now we'll go back to the sheeting group. Take this, am I be continued and drag it into the material shader slot. Right? So we basically like I said, use this as a bridge to connect the DGS material to its shading group. All right, now let's take a render and see what we get. So now whatever we render any kind of a ray tracing Ray that will interact with this object will really just pass right on through. And so, as a result, will you don't see this object at all in our render that we do have the ability to control this as far as the overall transparency goes. So as we start to lower this transparency, we can actually force thes raise to interact with this object again. And now you can see that our object is rendered, although now it's slightly transparent. So the interesting thing about this is that this continued can actually be used in more than just the basic material you'll notice in our first render. We were able to see the object itself as far as its shadows go, but we weren't able to see the geometry or the actual render ability to the camera. We can actually fix that if we're to take this DGs material. Let's say, rather than having the material be transparent or not rentable, we instead wanted its shadow to not be rentable so we can take this in my be continue note, plug it into the shadow shader of this material while still using the DGS as its basic cheater. And now we have the object itself that renders out, but you'll notice that it has now no shadows. So, really, what we're doing is very similar to what we would do if we were to just simply taken, object and go into its render stats and change things like the primary visibility or its ability to cast and receive shadows. The only difference is that instead of doing this now on a per object basis. We can control this on a per material basis. So any object that is using this material that we have set up will now be either transparent to the primary raise or any shadow raise or anything else that we decide, such as photons, interactions and things like that. So that's a look at how we can use this. M I b continue note.